C. Winston McQuillin fonds
C. Winston McQuillin was a prominent figure in Winnipeg’s amateur theatre scene in the 1920s. The Little Theatre located on Main Street was host to the majority of his theatre career. On this stage he acted in plays such as The Farmer’s Wife and Mr. Pim Passes By. He received critical acclaim for his role as “Oswald” in Ibsen’s Ghosts alongside the Winnipeg Community Players. Amongst his directing credits is the University of Manitoba Menorah Theatre Society’s production of Disraeli. McQuillin’s contributions to Winnipeg theatre aided in the establishment of the Manitoba Theatre Centre. The fonds consists of newsclippings detailing C. Winston McQuillin's theatre career.
Charlie Thorson fonds
Charlie Thorson was a seminal figure in the development of animation in the United States and Canadian children's literature. Beginning with political cartoons for local Icelandic language newspapers, his drawing career encompassed work in several fields and disciplines He illustrated Eaton's catalogues at the noted Canadian art studio Brigden's, designed and developed characters at nearly every major Holywood animation studio of the pre-World War II era, worked extensively in commercial and industrial advertising, and made some of the first attempts to develop Canadian children's literature. Among his many accomplishments, Thorson has been credited for designing beloved animated characters Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Bugs Bunny.
Community Players of Winnipeg fonds
Two lawyers, H.A.V. Green and C. Alan Crowley, established The Community of Players of Winnipeg as an amateur theatre group in 1921. Their mandate included providing facilities for the production of plays written by Canadian authors as well as providing Canadian playwrights and Canadian players the opportunity to practice their art and obtain national recognition. Support for the theatre group came in the form of memberships and subscriptions. The Community Players offered four major productions every season and often mounted additional productions. The change of name from the Community Players to Winnipeg Little Theatre must have occurred after 1932 although the date is not clearly defined. The fonds consists of programmes from 1923-1930, newspaper clippings, Treasurer's Reports of the 1927 and 1928 season, The Bill from 1928 to 1937, Little Theatre Gossip, correspondence, typescripts of speeches and historical summaries.
Faculty of Agriculture fonds
Manitoba Agricultural College was formerly opened in 1906. In the following year, Manitoba Agricultural College became affiliated with the University of Manitoba so that the degree in agriculture could be conferred on students who had successfully completed the five-year course. However, the affiliation of Manitoba Agricultural College with the University was terminated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1912 when the College was granted degree conferring powers. However, in 1916, the Act was amended and the affiliation between the College and University was restored again. The University of Manitoba conferred the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A) for the first time in May 1911. Regular instruction in Home Economics began the same year and the degree of Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.) was first conferred in May 1918. On March 1, 1924, by Act of the Manitoba Legislature, the administration of Manitoba Agricultural College was transferred to the Board of Governors of the University and it was arranged that in future, the instructional work of the College could be carried on as a Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics of the University. The length of the degree courses in both Agriculture and Home Economics was reduced to four sessions in 1927-1928 to conform with the other university faculties. In 1929, the Legislature selected the site in Fort Garry, already occupied by the Manitoba Agricultural College since 1913, as the permanent site of the university. A systematic program of work in the field of rural adult education was begun in 1940. By 1941, the Faculty consisted of six departments: Animal Science, Bacteriology and Animal Pathology, Dairy Husbandry, Entomology, Plant Science ,and Soils. In 1946, the Department of Agricultural Engineering was added to the faculty. In 1966, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea, twenty kilometers south of Winnipeg. In 1970, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics separated into two independent faculties, Agriculture and Home Economics. Beginning in 1971, the Faculty of Agriculture, through sponsorship from the provincial government, became involved with various foreign aid programs. This culminated in 1979 when the Canadian International Development Agency (C.I.D.A.) financed a joint agricultural program with the University of Zambia. In July 1991, the Faculty became the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.
Faculty of Human Ecology fonds
The present Faculty of Human Ecology traces its beginnings to a diploma in Household Sciences in 1910 at the Manitoba Agricultural College. The Diploma program became a degree in Home Economics in 1915. Three years later, Mary Kelso was named first Director of Home Economics. In 1924, the Manitoba Agricultural College became the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics at the University of Manitoba. In 1943, the Division of Home Economics became the School of Home Economics, but remained within the Faculty of Agriculture. In 1950, the School of Home Economics moved back into its original building following renovations, ending 26 years of residence in temporary buildings. The Departments of Food and Nutrition and Clothing and Textiles were created in 1967. The School of Home Economics was not granted official faculty status until 1970, ending a 60-year tie with the Faculty of Agriculture. In the following year, a Department of Family Studies was created with Dr. Lola Jackson as Head. The Faculty changed its name in 1981 to Human Ecology, reflecting the diversification of curricula. The next year saw the creation of a Bachelor degree in Human Ecology and, in 1983, a Ph.D. in Food and Nutritional Sciences was offered in conjunction with the Faculty of Agriculture.
Hilda Morrish fonds
Hilda Morrish grew up in Hove, England and joined the Women's Royal Naval Service in 1940. Morrish's parents were pacifists and disapproved of her joining the WRNS. Their disapproval led to her request for a transfer to civilian work assisting tha arriving United States Army in Gloucester, Cheltenham. Morrish was later in Paris on VE Day and toured France and Germany immediately following the war. The digitized material on this site includes images of black and white photographs taken by Hilda Morrish with a Voigtlander 35 mm camera. The photographs were developed and printed in a makeshift photo lab in a hotel bathroom. A bidet was used to wash the prints and an enlarger to magnify the images.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
Prairie Theatre Exchange fonds
The Prairie Theatre Exchange occupies an important place in the cultural and educational life of Winnipeg. In 1958, two of the city's oldest theatrical organizations, Theatre 77 and the Winnipeg Little Theatre, merged to form the Manitoba Theatre Centre (M.T.C.). The M.T.C. set out to provide a better public service through improved professional productions, more new plays, and the development of future artists, which John Hirsch and Tom Hendry were instrumental in developing. In 1960, the M.T.C. formed the Manitoba Theatre School to emphasize its educational mission, but after twelve successful years the School was closed due to lack of funding. In 1973, however, through an effort spearheaded by Colin Jackson and Charles Huband, the Manitoba Theatre Workshop (M.T.W.) was opened as a replacement to the Manitoba Theatre School. The M.T.W. supported creative expression in the community through its school, its outreach program, and its theatre by encouraging local playwrights and performers. In 1981, the organization changed its name to the Prairie Theatre Exchange while reaffirming its original objectives. In December 1988, the Prairie Theatre Exchange realized a major objective when it was approved as a Teaching Centre by the University of Manitoba. In 1989, after realizing long and steady growth, the P.T.E. moved from its original home on 160 Princess Street (the old Grain Exchange Building) into its new $3.5 million facility comprising 42,500 square feet in the Portage Place Mall in downtown Winnipeg. This collection features photographs of past Prairie Theatre Exchange productions and their performers.
Rare books collection
Rare books and various other printed or manuscript materials covering a wide variety of areas are held in Archives & Special Collections. The collection numbers approximately 30,000 volumes and is constantly expanding. Included in the collection are the Dysart Memorial Collection of Rare Books & Manuscripts, the St. John's College Rare Book Collection, and the Slavic Rare Book Collection. Further subject strengths of the Rare Book Collection are in Canadiana, particularly in Canadian Prairie literature, social history, immigration, agricultural development of western Canada, and early Arctic exploration; early native language syllabics; church history and philosophy; bibles (including the 1611 King James Bible); and English literature.
Stobie Family fonds - Theatre, Ballet and Concert Programs
William and Margaret Stobie were English professors at the University of Manitoba with strong connections to the local and national theatre communities. William served a term as President of the Winnipeg Little Theatre Group. Margaret spent several years acting, producing and directing local theatre as well as working for the CBC in various dramatic roles. This digital collection consists of theatre, ballet and concert programs dating from 1936 to 1979 collected by the Stobie's. Included are programs from the Winnipeg Little Theatre Group, Shoestring Theatre, University of Manitoba Stage and Glee Clubs, Children's Theatre, Manitoba Drama Festival, Winnipeg Summer Theatre Association, Manitoba Drama League, Theatre 77, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, and many more.
University Relations and Information Office fonds
The University Relations and Information Office was created in 1958 to publicize events at the University of Manitoba through various forms of media. Operating directly under the authority of the President, the Office prepared articles, press releases and public displays. The Office financed Alumni Association activities and publications such as the Alumni Journal. Eventually the Alumni Association assumed the public relations arm for University alumni while internal University news was covered by the Information Office through publication of the bi-monthly newspaper, The Bulletin. In 1960, secretarial staff was added to the Office, and the Public Relations Officer and Information Assistant became the Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Associate Editor of the Alumni Journal, respectively.