Faculty of Human Ecology fonds
The present Faculty of Human Ecology traces its beginnings to a diploma in Household Sciences in 1910 at the Manitoba Agricultural College. The Diploma program became a degree in Home Economics in 1915. Three years later, Mary Kelso was named first Director of Home Economics. In 1924, the Manitoba Agricultural College became the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics at the University of Manitoba. In 1943, the Division of Home Economics became the School of Home Economics, but remained within the Faculty of Agriculture. In 1950, the School of Home Economics moved back into its original building following renovations, ending 26 years of residence in temporary buildings. The Departments of Food and Nutrition and Clothing and Textiles were created in 1967. The School of Home Economics was not granted official faculty status until 1970, ending a 60-year tie with the Faculty of Agriculture. In the following year, a Department of Family Studies was created with Dr. Lola Jackson as Head. The Faculty changed its name in 1981 to Human Ecology, reflecting the diversification of curricula. The next year saw the creation of a Bachelor degree in Human Ecology and, in 1983, a Ph.D. in Food and Nutritional Sciences was offered in conjunction with the Faculty of Agriculture.
Prairie Theatre Exchange fonds
The Prairie Theatre Exchange occupies an important place in the cultural and educational life of Winnipeg. In 1958, two of the city's oldest theatrical organizations, Theatre 77 and the Winnipeg Little Theatre, merged to form the Manitoba Theatre Centre (M.T.C.). The M.T.C. set out to provide a better public service through improved professional productions, more new plays, and the development of future artists, which John Hirsch and Tom Hendry were instrumental in developing. In 1960, the M.T.C. formed the Manitoba Theatre School to emphasize its educational mission, but after twelve successful years the School was closed due to lack of funding. In 1973, however, through an effort spearheaded by Colin Jackson and Charles Huband, the Manitoba Theatre Workshop (M.T.W.) was opened as a replacement to the Manitoba Theatre School. The M.T.W. supported creative expression in the community through its school, its outreach program, and its theatre by encouraging local playwrights and performers. In 1981, the organization changed its name to the Prairie Theatre Exchange while reaffirming its original objectives. In December 1988, the Prairie Theatre Exchange realized a major objective when it was approved as a Teaching Centre by the University of Manitoba. In 1989, after realizing long and steady growth, the P.T.E. moved from its original home on 160 Princess Street (the old Grain Exchange Building) into its new $3.5 million facility comprising 42,500 square feet in the Portage Place Mall in downtown Winnipeg. This collection features photographs of past Prairie Theatre Exchange productions and their performers.
University Relations and Information Office fonds
The University Relations and Information Office was created in 1958 to publicize events at the University of Manitoba through various forms of media. Operating directly under the authority of the President, the Office prepared articles, press releases and public displays. The Office financed Alumni Association activities and publications such as the Alumni Journal. Eventually the Alumni Association assumed the public relations arm for University alumni while internal University news was covered by the Information Office through publication of the bi-monthly newspaper, The Bulletin. In 1960, secretarial staff was added to the Office, and the Public Relations Officer and Information Assistant became the Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Associate Editor of the Alumni Journal, respectively.