Andrew Taylor fonds
Andrew Taylor (1907-1993) was one of Canada's foremost polar explorers. Taylor, a Scottish immigrant, earned his engineering degree from the University of Manitoba in 1931. Upon graduation, he landed a job as a Provincial Surveyor and in that capacity, he observed much of rural Manitoba prior to its transformation brought about by hydro-electric, agricultural, mineral, timber and urban development. He was stationed in Churchill, Manitoba in 1931 and 1932. Taylor moved to Flin Flon, Manitoba in 1933 and eventually became Town Engineer. In this capacity, many of the town's roadways, drains, sewers and water supply lines are left as part of his legacy. The digitized photographs from the Andrew Taylor fonds document Taylor's time in northern Manitoba as a surveyor and engineer.
Centre for Settlement Studies fonds
At a meeting in 1966, a group representing several departments of the University of Manitoba expressed a common interest in an interdisciplinary approach to the problems associated with human settlement. Their concern focused primarily on the communities of western and northern Canada. A request for funding, presented to the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, was favourably received resulting in the formation of the Centre for Settlement Studies in 1967 with John E. Page as first Director. Believing that the social and economic problems associated with human settlement might be a limiting factor in the settlement of Canada's northern communities, Page made this topic the first major focus of research. By 1974, the Centre had reached its peak of activity. The Centre for Settlement Studies ceased to function on June 30, 1976, although research projects continued to be published well into 1977. The digital collection includes the Centre's Source Files including drafts of publications, papers and presentations, partially completed projects, analyses, and related data.
George Swinton fonds
George Swinton was a reknowned authority on Inuit art and the author of numerous articles on the subject. His own art hangs in the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He studied Economics and Political Science in Vienna from 1936 to 1938 before coming to Canada in 1939. He served five years with the Canadian Intelligence Corps in the Canadian Army, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1944. He completed a Bachelor of Arts at McGill in 1946 and took courses at the Montreal School of Art and Design from 1946 to 1947 and the Art Students' League of New York from 1949 to 1950. Swinton was the Curator of the Saskatoon Art Centre from 1947 to 1949. He was an instructor at Smith College from 1950 to 1953 and Artist-in-Residence at Queen's University from 1953 to 1954. That fall, he joined the faculty of the School of Art at the University of Manitoba, a position that he held for twenty years. From 1974 to 1981, he was a professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. His final academic position was an adjunct professorship in the Department of Art History at Carleton University from 1981 to 1985.
George Swinton fonds (WAG)
George Swinton was a reknowned authority on Inuit art and the author of numerous articles on the subject. His own art hangs in the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He studied Economics and Political Science in Vienna from 1936 to 1938 before coming to Canada in 1939. He served five years with the Canadian Intelligence Corps in the Canadian Army, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1944. He completed a Bachelor of Arts at McGill in 1946 and took courses at the Montreal School of Art and Design from 1946 to 1947 and the Art Students' League of New York from 1949 to 1950. Swinton was the Curator of the Saskatoon Art Centre from 1947 to 1949. He was an instructor at Smith College from 1950 to 1953 and Artist-in-Residence at Queen's University from 1953 to 1954. That fall, he joined the faculty of the School of Art at the University of Manitoba, a position that he held for twenty years. From 1974 to 1981, he was a professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. His final academic position was an adjunct professorship in the Department of Art History at Carleton University from 1981 to 1985. This digital collection includes material from the Winnipeg Art Gallery Archives as part of the Prairie Prestige project.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
John Leslie Charles fonds
Major John Leslie Charles was a Chief Engineer for Candian National Railway's (CN) Western Region and consulting engineer for CN. He later became responsible for much of the engineering and construction in western Canada, northern Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories. In 1926, he was appointed as a transit man for a survey crew and surveyed the second section of the Hudson Bay Railway (Limestone- Fort Churchill). He also published studies of the Great Slave Lake Railway, the first railway to enter the Northwest Territories and the most northerly railway connected to the continental system. The collection includes articles, reports and maps created by Charles regarding Northern Canadian railway routes.
Kathleen Rice fonds
Kathleen Rice, a former math teacher, and her brother, Lincoln, decided to stake a homestead near The Pas, Manitoba. Lincoln joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force but Kathleen decided to stay on the homestead alone. After teaching herself about geology and prospecting, she headed to the Herb Lake area north of The Pas. She claimed an island - later called Rice Island - in Weksusko Lake, which turned out to be very rich in copper and nickel. The fonds includes newsclippings about Rice and manuscripts and drawings by Rice about her time in Northern Manitoba.
Melita and David A. Ennis fonds
The Melita and David A. Ennis fonds consists of 2 scrapbooks featuring photographs depicting life in Churchill, Manitoba between 1929 and 1932. The photographs depict construction projects, settlement communities, rail roads, indigenous peoples, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, and images of northern landscapes. They document the process of mechanization and frontier expansion.
Nan Shipley fonds
Nan Shipley published fourteen books and numerous short stories and articles. Her first book, Anna and the Indians (1955), has been reprinted many times. Among her better known publications are Frances and the Crees (1957), The Railway Builders (1965), The James Evan Story (1966), and Churchill: Canada’s Northern Gateway (1974). As a big supporter of Aboriginal and Metis culture, she organized Manitoba’s first Indian handicrafts sales centre (1959) and focused her writing on Indian and Metis women. Her photograph collection depicts hydro and railroad developments in northern Manitoba and of the growth and demise of northern towns and settlements. Among the portraits are native peoples and early missionaries and settlers.