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A.H. Reginald Buller fonds
Arthur Henry (A.H.) Reginald Buller was born August 14, 1874 in Moseley, Birmingham, England. In 1904, Buller was appointed the first professor of Botany and Geology at the University of Manitoba, one of the original six professors hired by the University. Buller served as Head of the Botany Department until his retirement in 1936. Buller won international recognition for his work on fungi and wheat rust. The drawings included in this digital collection were discovered by faculty of the University of Manitoba Botany Department in Dr. Buller's original map cabinet. They consist of hand drawn, inked, and watercoloured botanical diagrams and charts.
A.S. Morton Manuscript Collection
Arthur Silver Morton came to the University of Saskatchewan in 1914 and served both as head of the History Department and University Librarian until his retirement in 1940. Upon arriving in Saskatoon, Morton embarked on the study of Western Canadian History and the preservation of the region's historical documents and historic sites. Over the next four decades he published several books. The digitized material from the A.S. Morton Manuscript Collection includes photographs and documents relating to prairie settlement, including pioneer accounts; manuscripts collected by James Frederick Church Wright relating to the Doukhobours in Canada; statements of pioneer settlers; stories of pioneer experiences in Saskatoon; early settlers' reminiscences; documents pertaining to immigration among Hungarians, Mennonites, Icleanders, and Ukrainians; the papers of "New Canadians"; biographies; and the Meilicke papers.
Alice Cameron Brown fonds
Alice Cameron Brown was born in Rolling River, Manitoba in 1898 and grew up near Minnedosa, Manitoba. She was the daughter of Sarah and Duncan Cameron. In 1921, Alice graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Manitoba. While working as a teacher in Tisdale, Saskatchewan in 1922, she met James Edward Brown. The couple and their daughter Elizabeth Allison lived in Tisdale for twenty-six years. In 1934, Brown won first prize in the Canadian Author's Association poetry contest. The winning poem was published in a few magazines, after which numerous poems of hers were published. In 1952, the Brown family moved to Beamsville, Ontario where James passed away in 1965. Alice Cameron Brown died in 1993. The digitized material from the Alice Cameron Brown fonds consists of correspondence pertaining to Brown's teaching career.
Alpha Omega Society fonds
The Alpha Omega Society was created at the University of Saskatchewan in 1930 to "foster such social and intellectual activities as will bring the students of Ukrainian descent into a closer bond and a clearer understanding within the rest of the University." The digitized material from the Alpha Omega Society fonds consists of a scrapbook that contains photographs and yearly lists of Alpha Omega Society members from inception in 1930-1931. Also included are booklets from graduations and concerts, newspaper clippings from the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, University of Saskatchewan Sheaf and Ukrainian New Pathway (in Ukrainian) detailing society activities and student achievements. Correspondence between members, faculty and other individuals are also included in the scrapbook, which was compiled in 1962-1963.
Andrew Taylor fonds
Andrew Taylor (1907-1993) was one of Canada's foremost polar explorers. Taylor, a Scottish immigrant, earned his engineering degree from the University of Manitoba in 1931. Upon graduation, he landed a job as a Provincial Surveyor and in that capacity, he observed much of rural Manitoba prior to its transformation brought about by hydro-electric, agricultural, mineral, timber and urban development. He was stationed in Churchill, Manitoba in 1931 and 1932. Taylor moved to Flin Flon, Manitoba in 1933 and eventually became Town Engineer. In this capacity, many of the town's roadways, drains, sewers and water supply lines are left as part of his legacy. The digitized photographs from the Andrew Taylor fonds document Taylor's time in northern Manitoba as a surveyor and engineer.
Angus Shortt fonds
Angus Shortt was well-known Winnipeg artist and painter of wildlife art. Due to his mother’s influence as an artist, he developed a love for sketching birds around the Silver Heights farm located near the family home. In 1926, determined to find employment as an artist, Shortt sought a position at Brigden’s, a commercial art firm. Despite his desire to become an illustrator, Brigden’s offered him an apprenticeship as a wood engraver, which he accepted. As part of the apprenticeship, Shortt was sent to the Winnipeg School of Art, where he studied under L. LeMoine Fitzgerald. Thereafter Shortt chose to work for the newly formed Ducks Unlimited Canada as an artist in the public relations department. He worked at Ducks Unlimited for thirty-four years (1939-1973). There he specialized in painting ducks and geese and donated his painting to many Ducks Unlimited fund-raisings. Angus Shortt also designed series of the Manitoba wildflower and bird paintings, series of 12 medallions featuring designs based on provincial wildflowers for Canada's Centennial, series of greeting cards depicting a variety of ducks, and sets of playing cards with wildlife illustrations for the U.S. Playing Card Co., Ohio. He illustrated Treasure of Waterfowl (1946), Birds of Colorado (1965), and Ducks and Men: Forty Years of Co-operation in Conservation (1978). He also contributed to the making of eighteen films for Ducks Unlimited. Ducks Unlimited named a lake after him (Shortt Lake) to honor his longtime work. In 1962, he designed a fifteen cent stamp for the post office department. After his retirement, Shortt continued to accept commissions for paintings into the 1990s but in his later years only painted for his own enjoyment.
Anne Yanchyshyn fonds
Anne Yanchyshyn taught in Varennes School for 24 years and after her early retirement she took Oral History workshop classes at the Archives of Manitoba. Anne Yanchyshyn edited the book MPC Flashbacks, a commemorative local history celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the arrival of settlers in Meleb-Park Cumming School District area. In the book she documented the local history of the Ukrainian, Polish as well as the German and Jewish pioneers in the Interlake area. The digitized material from the Anne Yanchyshyn fonds consists of audio recordings of her interviews with Ukrainian and Polish pioneers in the Interlake area, plus printed summations and transcripts of those interviews.
Centre for Settlement Studies fonds
At a meeting in 1966, a group representing several departments of the University of Manitoba expressed a common interest in an interdisciplinary approach to the problems associated with human settlement. Their concern focused primarily on the communities of western and northern Canada. A request for funding, presented to the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, was favourably received resulting in the formation of the Centre for Settlement Studies in 1967 with John E. Page as first Director. Believing that the social and economic problems associated with human settlement might be a limiting factor in the settlement of Canada's northern communities, Page made this topic the first major focus of research. By 1974, the Centre had reached its peak of activity. The Centre for Settlement Studies ceased to function on June 30, 1976, although research projects continued to be published well into 1977. The digital collection includes the Centre's Source Files including drafts of publications, papers and presentations, partially completed projects, analyses, and related data.
Charlie Thorson fonds
Charlie Thorson was a seminal figure in the development of animation in the United States and Canadian children's literature. Beginning with political cartoons for local Icelandic language newspapers, his drawing career encompassed work in several fields and disciplines He illustrated Eaton's catalogues at the noted Canadian art studio Brigden's, designed and developed characters at nearly every major Holywood animation studio of the pre-World War II era, worked extensively in commercial and industrial advertising, and made some of the first attempts to develop Canadian children's literature. Among his many accomplishments, Thorson has been credited for designing beloved animated characters Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Bugs Bunny.
Copland, Hunter and Anderson Family fonds
Margaret Elizabeth Hunter, born 18 April 1849, and William Adam Hunter, born 17 June 1845, married in Dumfrese, Scotland, on 22 December 1870. A year later they emigrated to Canada, settling first in Cayuga, Ontario. In 1883 Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, encouraged them to move west with the Saskatoon Temperance Colonization Society and they built a home at Llewellyn. Margaret and William had 7 children; their two oldest daughters, Mary Kerr Hunter and Barbara Elizabeth Hunter, married brothers from the Anderson family – Burpee James Anderson and Newton Joseph Anderson, respectively. Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, was one of the first settlers in Saskatoon, and was trained as a chemist and druggist. The University of Saskatchewan is located on his original homestead. The digitized material from the Copland, Hunter and Anderson Family fonds consists of documents that describe the lives of the Copland, Hunter and Anderson families, notably their early years following Margaret and William Hunter's move to Canada and years in Saskatoon. It includes materials relating to events such as the 1885 Resistance; later material documenting student life, at the University, as well as materials documenting the daily life of a pioneering farm family. Included are diaries of Barbara Elizabeth Anderson, nee Hunter (1874-1951) documenting her daily life, 1899-1934 and 1944; memoirs of Mrs. Barbara E. Anderson (covering 1874-1905); and background material.
Denise Catherine Kolesar fonds
Denise Kolesar, a native of Neepawa, Manitoba, with family ties to the Polonia and Mountain Road areas, became interested in the life and works of Fr. Philip Ruh during research efforts for the 2004 Ukrainian Catholic Church Hundredth Anniversary Committee in Mountain Road, Manitoba. In October 2007, Kolesar conducted a research tour of churches in Saskatchewan and Alberta where she took digital photographs of churches. This digital collection consists of several digital photographs of the interiors and exteriors of Ukrainian Catholic churches in Saskatchewan and Alberta.
Dieter Roger fonds
Dieter Roger's works are primarily concerned with German immigrants and their adaptation and contributions to Canadian life. In 2000, Roger published Eckhardt-Gramatte Gedenkschrift fur das Familiengrab in Berlin-Wilhelmhagen, a monograph detailing the pre-immigration life of the Eckhardt-Grammate family of Winnipeg and their familial grave site in Germany. Roger has served as president of the Manitoba chapter of the German-Canadian Historical Association and has published books and articles in both English and German. The digitized material from the Dieter Roger fonds consists of a German newspaper article from the Kanada Kurier, dated 30, September 1999. The article, written in German, is entitled "Denkmalschutz und Ehrengrab: Dr. F. Eckhardts Familien-grabmal in Berlin," which detailed the pre-immigration life of the Eckhardt-Grammate family of Winnipeg and their familial grave site in Germany.
Dixon, Baker Family fonds
The Dixon family originally settled in Quebec before moving to Manitoba. Margaret Ann Purcell and George William Dixon were both born in Belfast, Ireland in 1858 and 1851, respectively. Both their families immigrated to Kildar in Joliette County, Quebec, where they were married in 1872. They moved to Rounthwaite, Manitoba, where they raised their family of 13 children. Most of their descendants still live in the Brandon area. The digitized material from the Dixon, Baker Family fonds includes genealogical information of the Dixon and Baker families between 1851 and 1963, land title deeds, farm receipts, and photographs of agricultural scenes in the early-twentieth century.
E. Cora Hind fonds
Ella Cora Hind, an agricultural writer and agriculture editor for the Manitoba Free Press, was known as an authority on agriculture, livestock, and wheat yields. Her opinion influenced prices on the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and western grain crops for several years. She was one of the first female writers and editors of the Manitoba Free Press. She was also a champion of women's suffrage and a strong supporter of the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the Political Equality League.
Edward Swiecicki fonds
In 1959, Edward Swiecicki and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. The digitized material from the Edward Swiecicki fonds consists of correspondence between Edward Swiecicki and the Very Reverend Monsignor J. Marty regarding the completion of the Grotto in Cook's Creek, Manitoba following the death of the architect, Father Philip Ruh. A photograph of the Grotto in Lourdes, France is also included.
Emil and Lynette Hain fonds
The Emil and Lynette Hain fonds consists of a collection of glass slides created by Ms. Hain's grandfather, Rev. Thomas Featherstone Watson, who documented the missionary work being undertaken in the Transvaal region of South Africa prior to the onset of the Boer War in 1899. Rev. Watson created glass slides from his original negatives and used them as the basis of his lecture tour titled "Missionary Labours in the Transvaal Before the War: Glimpses of Missionary Life in the Transvaal." The scenes depicted in this digital collection include the South African people, culture and countryside, churches, church services, European and South African ministers, and other glimpses into missionary life in South Africa. The rare and fascinating images in this collection provide some insight into the controversial practice of missionary work in a little-seen region of the world just prior to the outbreak of a violent war only a few years later.
Frederick Philip Grove fonds
Frederick Philip Grove arrived in Manitoba in September 1912. Although he kept his prior life very much a secret, he was born in 1879 as Felix Paul Greve in Radomno, a small Prussian town on the German-Polish border. In late July 1909 he faked his suicide and immigrated to North America. In Canada, he was a teacher/principal in a variety of rural schools, including Rapid City where he lived for seven years before moving to Ottawa in 1929. There, he joined Graphic Publishers until 1931, when he settled on an estate in Simcoe, Ontario. Grove wrote and his wife Catherine Wiens opened a Froebel Kindergarten. Grove suffered a crippling stroke in 1944 and although he continued to write, his health deteriorated. He died on August 19, 1948. During his Manitoba years between 1919 and 1929, Grove published twelve books, including Over Prairie Trails (1922), The Turn of the Year (1923), Settlers of the Marsh (1925), A Search for America (1927), Our Daily Bread (1928) and It Needs to be Said (1929). He also wrote many short stories, reviews, essays and articles, and a very large number of poems. In Ontario, several more books were published, starting with The Yoke of Life (1930). Fruits of the Earth (1933), Master of the Mill (1944), and his official autobiography In Search of Myself (1946) followed. His "ant-book", the Swiftian satire Consider Her Ways (1947), was published as a fragment. The digitized material from the Frederick Philip Grove fonds includes correspondence with I. Warkentin describing life in Canada in 1913, manuscripts written by Grove describing the experiences of immigrants, documents relating to Grove's Canadian 1921 citizenship, and photographs depicting Grove's home in Ashfield, MB.
G.W. Simpson fonds
George Wilfred Simpson's teaching career at the University of Saskatchewan started in 1922, with an appointment as instructor in History. By 1928 he had been promoted to full professor, and, in 1940, Simpson was appointed head of the History Department, a position he held until his retirement in 1958. Upon retirement, Simpson was named Professor Emeritus. During his career at the University of Saskatchewan, Simpson helped initiate the department of Slavic studies, was the first Canadian historian to learn Ukrainian, and edited the first history of the Ukraine published in English. He helped shape the policy of the Saskatchewan Archives Act and was the first Provincial Archivist (1945-1948). The digitized material from the G.W. Simpson fonds consists of files entitled “Ukrainian files” regarding the Ukrainian community in Saskatoon and University of Saskatchewan, 1930-1957; and material relating to Simpson’s association with the Advisory Committee on Co-operation in Canadian Citizenship (Nationalities Branch), 1941-1960.
Gallery One One One
Gallery One One One was established in 1965 to serve the School of Art and the public, showing and collecting contemporary and historical art. It now exists as the School of Art Gallery and is currently located in the ArtLab.
George Swinton fonds
George Swinton was a reknowned authority on Inuit art and the author of numerous articles on the subject. His own art hangs in the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He studied Economics and Political Science in Vienna from 1936 to 1938 before coming to Canada in 1939. He served five years with the Canadian Intelligence Corps in the Canadian Army, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1944. He completed a Bachelor of Arts at McGill in 1946 and took courses at the Montreal School of Art and Design from 1946 to 1947 and the Art Students' League of New York from 1949 to 1950. Swinton was the Curator of the Saskatoon Art Centre from 1947 to 1949. He was an instructor at Smith College from 1950 to 1953 and Artist-in-Residence at Queen's University from 1953 to 1954. That fall, he joined the faculty of the School of Art at the University of Manitoba, a position that he held for twenty years. From 1974 to 1981, he was a professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. His final academic position was an adjunct professorship in the Department of Art History at Carleton University from 1981 to 1985.
George Swinton fonds (WAG)
George Swinton was a reknowned authority on Inuit art and the author of numerous articles on the subject. His own art hangs in the National Gallery of Canada, the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He studied Economics and Political Science in Vienna from 1936 to 1938 before coming to Canada in 1939. He served five years with the Canadian Intelligence Corps in the Canadian Army, becoming a Canadian citizen in 1944. He completed a Bachelor of Arts at McGill in 1946 and took courses at the Montreal School of Art and Design from 1946 to 1947 and the Art Students' League of New York from 1949 to 1950. Swinton was the Curator of the Saskatoon Art Centre from 1947 to 1949. He was an instructor at Smith College from 1950 to 1953 and Artist-in-Residence at Queen's University from 1953 to 1954. That fall, he joined the faculty of the School of Art at the University of Manitoba, a position that he held for twenty years. From 1974 to 1981, he was a professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University. His final academic position was an adjunct professorship in the Department of Art History at Carleton University from 1981 to 1985. This digital collection includes material from the Winnipeg Art Gallery Archives as part of the Prairie Prestige project.
Gloria Romaniuk fonds
Gloria Romaniuk moved with her husband, Greg Stanwick, to Cook’s Creek, Manitoba in 1976, to operate Cook’s Creek General Store. Romaniuk grew interested in the life and works of Rev. Philip Ruh, OMI in 1982 and in 1983 she launched and coordinated the “Ruh Project”, an effort to document Ruh’s life and works. Together with Olly Charney, Romaniuk located materials which had been created by, or belonged to Ruh and produced more than seventy audio interviews with individuals who knew or worked with Ruh. She wrote a local history pamphlet for Cook’s Creek church, edited the translation into English of Ruh’s autobiography "Missionary and Architect (Autobiography)", and wrote several newspaper and magazine articles. She has served as the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg Archivist since 2003. The digitized material from the Gloria Romaniuk fonds consists of several digital photographs and printed photographs of the interiors and exteriors of several Ukrainian Catholic churches and church facilities throughout western Canada.
Hallama Family fonds
Wenceslaus Hallama settled in Canada in 1891, and purchased land near Grande Pointe from his Uncle Joseph Schwab four years later. He married Barbara Blahnik from Bohemia and they had two children. Wenceslaus was the first farmer in the area to own a seed drill, and a gasoline tractor. In 1938, their only son Joseph took over the farm until 1971. In 1971 his son Edward took over the farm. The digitized material from the Hallama Family fonds consists of photographs, farm account books and a history of the Hallama family and farm.
Henry Kalen fonds
Henry Kalen was a Manitoba-born architect and photographer. Kalen worked as an architect until 1960 when he enlisted in Art Education at the Illinois Institute of Technology to become a professional photographer. He joined the University of Manitoba Faculty of Architecture where in addition to teaching photography he assisted in teaching Architectural Drawing, Graphical Presentation, and Fundamentals of Design between 1960 and 1971. Kalen started his own photography and postcard distribution company. His stock photographs were used in publications such as Maclean's, Chatelaine, and Canadian Geographic. His book, Henry Kalen's Winnipeg, was a local best-seller for many years.
Hilda Morrish fonds
Hilda Morrish grew up in Hove, England and joined the Women's Royal Naval Service in 1940. Morrish's parents were pacifists and disapproved of her joining the WRNS. Their disapproval led to her request for a transfer to civilian work assisting tha arriving United States Army in Gloucester, Cheltenham. Morrish was later in Paris on VE Day and toured France and Germany immediately following the war. The digitized material on this site includes images of black and white photographs taken by Hilda Morrish with a Voigtlander 35 mm camera. The photographs were developed and printed in a makeshift photo lab in a hotel bathroom. A bidet was used to wash the prints and an enlarger to magnify the images.
Irene Knysh fonds
Irene Knysh was a feminist, journalist, and author of many books on the Ukrainian women’s movement. Throughout the course of her illustrious writing career, Knysh corresponded with leaders of the Ukrainian women's movement in Canada and the United States, most notably Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, one of the founding members of the Ukrainian National Women's League of America. Knysh also corresponded with famed Ukrainian dance instructor, Vasil' Avramenko. This digital collection features items from the Irene Knysh fonds, many of which were acquired by Knysh during the course of her research. Items featured in the collection include the original record book of the Ukrainian Women's Association of Canada (1930-1931) and photographs of Irene Knysh, Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, members of the National Women's League of America (SUA - Soiuz Ukrainok Ameryky), and Vasil' Avramenko.
Jaropolk Radkewycz fonds
In 1961, with the intention of entering the priesthood, Jaropolk Radkewycz began his studies at the Redemptorist Minor Seminary in Roblin, Manitoba. In 1967, he decided to begin studies for the diocesan priesthood, pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Manitoba in 1971, followed by a Bachelor of Theology degree in 1974 and a Bachelor degree in Canon Law in 1975 at the University of St. Paul in Ottawa. He was ordained by Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk in Winnipeg in 1974. Radkewycz served in parishes in Winnipeg, Portage la Prairie and Brandon. In addition, he served as chaplain of St. Paul College at the University of Manitoba, as lecturer at the St. Boniface School of Nursing, as chairman of the Manitoba Medico-Moral Committee, and chaplain of the Catholic Physicians Guild in Manitoba. He served as assistant vicar general from May 1975, and as the Metropolitan’s secretary until the time of his accidental death on April 29, 1996. The digitized material from the Jaropolk Radkewycz fonds consists of nearly 80 photographs of the interiors and exteriors of several Ukrainian Catholic churches and church facilities throughout western Canada.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
John Leslie Charles fonds
Major John Leslie Charles was a Chief Engineer for Candian National Railway's (CN) Western Region and consulting engineer for CN. He later became responsible for much of the engineering and construction in western Canada, northern Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories. In 1926, he was appointed as a transit man for a survey crew and surveyed the second section of the Hudson Bay Railway (Limestone- Fort Churchill). He also published studies of the Great Slave Lake Railway, the first railway to enter the Northwest Territories and the most northerly railway connected to the continental system. The collection includes articles, reports and maps created by Charles regarding Northern Canadian railway routes.
John Zborowsky fonds
In 1959, John Zborowsky Jr. and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. Zborowsky served as Grand Knight from 1962 to 1963, compiling documentation of project expenses, funds raised, photos of various stages in the effort, work schedules, newspaper clippings, and related records. The digitized material from the John Zborowsky fonds consists of nearly 20 photographs illustrating the construction of the Lourdes Calvary Grotto and the Ukrainian Catholic church in Cook's Creek, Manitoba, as well as a photograph of St. Joseph's Ukrainian Catholic church in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Josiah Jones Bell fonds
Josiah Jones Bell was an Ensign with the Ontario Battalion in Colonel Garnet Wolseley's Red River Expedition of 1870. The expedition was intended to exert Canadian sovereignty in the newly created Province of Manitoba. The digitized material from the Josiah Jones Bell fonds consists of several photographs taken by Bell during his travels with the Wolseley Expedition. The photographs depict several of the buildings located in the Red River Valley region during this time.
Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Resistance)
The Kenneth Hayes fonds, donated to the Archives and Special Collections in 1998, consists of eighteen black and white photographs of which fifteen are originals (taken between 1869 and 1890) and three are photographs of photographs. These photographs depict participants in the North-West Resistance, including Gabriel Dumont and Louis Riel. The fonds also contains four photographic negatives of death certificates, including that of Louis Riel; a telegram; and a letter pertaining to said telegram. Note that this collection was previously called Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Rebellion).
Klymkiw Family fonds
Walter (Volodymyr) Klymkiw was born in Saranchuky, Ukraine in 1926. Emigrating to Canada in 1928, he and his parents settled in Winnipeg. In 1950 he earned a B.A. in English and History at the University of British Columbia. He returned a year later to Winnipeg, and received a teaching certificate from the University of Manitoba. In 1951 he began conducting the Ukrainian National Federation Choir (renamed the Olexander Koshetz Choir in 1967) of Winnipeg, under the guidance of Tetiana Koshetz and Pavlo Macenko. Upon receiving his teaching certificate, Klymkiw began his career as a history teacher in 1953 at Glenwood Junior High School. He continued to teach at several schools until his retirement in 1983. Retirement allowed Klymkiw to devote more time as choral director of the Olexander Koshetz Choir. During his nearly fifty years with the choir, Klymkiw and his choir toured throughout Canada, Ukraine, Poland, the Czech Republic, Western Europe, and South America. Besides his choir, Klymkiw and his wife devoted much of their time to various community activities. The digitized material from the Klymkiw Family fonds consists of geneological information and photographs of family members and of certain Ukrainian national organizations.
Landmarks, Monuments & Built Heritage of the West
A major component of community life is the landmarks, monuments and built heritage within that community. Canadian historians have often claimed that the physical and geographical heritage of Canadians have played a key role in the development of our identity as a nation. Western Canadians, in particular, have been molded by their landscapes and architecture. From sod huts to towering skyscrapers, the built heritage of western Canadian communities has influenced the development of the region and the people. This website consists of nearly 7000 digitized items from the archival holdings of the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg Archives, the Archives of Manitoba, and the University of Calgary's Canadian Architectural Archives pertaining to this topic. The digitized textual documents, photographs, blueprints, and audio and video clips illustrate how western Canada has been shaped by its architecture.
Logan Family fonds
Margaret Frances Logan graduated from Manitoba College in 1900 with a B.A. in Philosophy and received her M.A. in Philosophy in 1904. Never married, she taught at various schools in Saskatchewan (Conquest, Gull Lake, Swift Current) until she retired to her hometown of Lauder, Manitoba. She died in 1974 at the age of 98. The journal was written by Logan as she attended the Singoosh Summer School for Teachers in 1942. This school was affiliated with the University of Manitoba and was located on Singush Lake in Duck Mountain Provincial Park. This journal was donated by Logan’s great-niece, Pat Greenways in 2018.
Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee
The Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee collection consists of a letter written by Louis Riel in 1883 to his friend Pierre Lavallee, the Court Clerk of Marquette-East and the Clerk and Treasurer of the municipality of St. Francois Xavier. The letter discusses the Riel's thoughts on the relationship between the Metis and French Canadians.
Louis Riel Photograph Collection
Louis Riel was born in Red River and was educated in St. Boniface before being sent to the Petit Séminaire de Montréal. He returned to Red River around 1868 and soon came to lead Métis hostility to the prospective Canadian annexation of the settlement. His direction of the Red River Rebellion as president of the provincial government was marred only by the execution of Thomas Scott, which allowed the Canadian government to name him an outlaw. He was later elected to Parliament from Provencher on several occasions but was expelled. In June 1884, he was asked by a group of settlers in Saskatchewan to lead them in protest against the Canadian government. The protest turned to violence in 1885, and the Métis and indigenous peoples led by Riel were quickly and brutally suppressed after military defeat at the Battle of Batoche. He was tried for treason, rejecting a plea of insanity advanced by his lawyers, and was hanged at Regina on 16 November 1885.
Mabel Timlin fonds
Mabel Timlin began lecturing in Economics at the University of Saskatchewan in 1935. She was promoted to full professor in 1950, and retired in 1959. Timlin was an authority on Keynesian economic theory, monetary policy and immigration. Among her many publications were Keynesian Economics (1942) and “Does Canada Need More People?” (1951). Following her retirement, the Canada Council granted her a special Fellowship to study Canadian immigration. Later, she was appointed research assistant with the Social Science Research Council of Canada and co-authored The Social Sciences in Canada: Two Studies (1968). She was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, first woman president of the Canadian Political Science Association, and a member of the Order of Canada. The digitized material from the Mabel Timlin fonds consists of records related to Canadian immigration laws, as well subject files pertaining to the politics of immigration. The records include research notes, essays on immigration, photocopies and microfilms of some of the Laurier papers, etc., along with a manuscript copy of Does Canada Need More People?
MacDonald Family fonds
John Duncan MacDonald and his wife Anne immigrated to Manitoba from Scotland in 1872. John McIntyre MacDonald was one of their nine children. He married Sarah McMillan and they had three children. John Duncan was the second of three, and he married Margaret Greer. They had four children, the second being Robert James. Robert married Edna Thompson in 1948 and they had four children. John McIntyre homesteaded and over time more land was bought around the original homestead and the land was passed on to descendants. The digitized material from the MacDonald Family fonds consists of John D. MacDonald's pocket diary (1912), which detailed the homesteading experience of this Scottish immigrant, and the family history of the MacDonald's.
Manitoba Eastern European Heritage Society fonds
The Manitoba Eastern European Heritage Society fonds documents the architecture, art, and history of the province’s Ukrainian Byzantine-rite churches. The project was inspired by a desire for knowledge of the architectural history as well as mutual concern for the spiritual future of Eastern European churches in Manitoba.

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