A.H. Reginald Buller fonds
Arthur Henry (A.H.) Reginald Buller was born August 14, 1874 in Moseley, Birmingham, England. In 1904, Buller was appointed the first professor of Botany and Geology at the University of Manitoba, one of the original six professors hired by the University. Buller served as Head of the Botany Department until his retirement in 1936. Buller won international recognition for his work on fungi and wheat rust. The drawings included in this digital collection were discovered by faculty of the University of Manitoba Botany Department in Dr. Buller's original map cabinet. They consist of hand drawn, inked, and watercoloured botanical diagrams and charts.
Connie Macmillan Collection
The Connie Macmillan Collection depicts several portraits of Aboriginal Peoples taken in 1880s Winnipeg taken by James D. Hall and Skene Lowe. Hall and Lowe formed a partnership in 1882, creating a photography studio titled "Hall & Lowe, Artists and Photographers". They advertised as selling "Indian photos (taken from life), Xmas cards, views of Winnipeg." The subjects of the photographs were paid for their images and their photographs were advertised for sale in the store's display windows. Hall & Lowe moved to British Columbia in the mid-1880s.
Emil and Lynette Hain fonds
The Emil and Lynette Hain fonds consists of a collection of glass slides created by Ms. Hain's grandfather, Rev. Thomas Featherstone Watson, who documented the missionary work being undertaken in the Transvaal region of South Africa prior to the onset of the Boer War in 1899. Rev. Watson created glass slides from his original negatives and used them as the basis of his lecture tour titled "Missionary Labours in the Transvaal Before the War: Glimpses of Missionary Life in the Transvaal." The scenes depicted in this digital collection include the South African people, culture and countryside, churches, church services, European and South African ministers, and other glimpses into missionary life in South Africa. The rare and fascinating images in this collection provide some insight into the controversial practice of missionary work in a little-seen region of the world just prior to the outbreak of a violent war only a few years later.
Gallery One One One
Gallery One One One was established in 1965 to serve the School of Art and the public, showing and collecting contemporary and historical art. It now exists as the School of Art Gallery and is currently located in the ArtLab.
Irena Knysh fonds
Irena Knysh was a feminist, journalist, and author of many books on the Ukrainian women’s movement. Throughout the course of her illustrious writing career, Knysh corresponded with leaders of the Ukrainian women's movement in Canada and the United States, most notably Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, one of the founding members of the Ukrainian National Women's League of America. Knysh also corresponded with famed Ukrainian dance instructor, Vasil' Avramenko. This digital collection features items from the Irena Knysh fonds, many of which were acquired by Knysh during the course of her research. Items featured in the collection include the original record book of the Ukrainian Women's Association of Canada (1930-1931) and photographs of Irena Knysh, Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, members of the National Women's League of America (SUA - Soiuz Ukrainok Ameryky), and Vasil' Avramenko.
Logan Family fonds
Margaret Frances Logan graduated from Manitoba College in 1900 with a B.A. in Philosophy and received her M.A. in Philosophy in 1904. Never married, she taught at various schools in Saskatchewan (Conquest, Gull Lake, Swift Current) until she retired to her hometown of Lauder, Manitoba. She died in 1974 at the age of 98. The journal was written by Logan as she attended the Singoosh Summer School for Teachers in 1942. This school was affiliated with the University of Manitoba and was located on Singush Lake in Duck Mountain Provincial Park. This journal was donated by Logan’s great-niece, Pat Greenways in 2018.
Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee
The Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee collection consists of a letter written by Louis Riel in 1883 to his friend Pierre Lavallee, the Court Clerk of Marquette-East and the Clerk and Treasurer of the municipality of St. Francois Xavier. The letter discusses the Riel's thoughts on the relationship between the Metis and French Canadians.
Sandra Barz fonds
Sandra Barz completed her education at Skidmore College graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in 1952. She began her career in publishing and later became interested in Inuit art after purchasing a few pieces while visiting Canada. Thereafter she began to research and compile information relating to Inuit prints from Arctic Quebec/Puvirnituq, Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Clyde River, Holman Island, and Pangnirtung. Her first exploration in this field involved developing, editing, and publishing 28 issues of Arts and Culture of the North from 1976 to 1984. She followed this work with a series of three volumes titled Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volumes I, II, and III. The volumes catalogue over 8,000 Inuit print images dating from 1957 to the present, produced in the aforementioned communities, as well as prints produced independently of the Arctic co-operative system. Barz's papers detail over forty years of dedication to documenting Inuit artist biographies, the evolution of printmaking, and encouraging growing interest for Inuit art worldwide.
Winnipeg Tribune Personalities Collection
The Winnipeg Tribune Personalities Collection consists of nearly 15,000 photographs of diverse persons of local, national, or international renown, taken by Tribune photographers, which were organized by Tribune staff into alphabetical files by the individuals' last names. Included in the Personalities Collection are former Canadian Prime Ministers and American Presidents; former Manitoba Premiers; influential Canadians; and. Canadian cultural figures. Many other photographers depict the lives of everyday Manitobans and Canadians and reflect the diversity of Canada's population through photographs of Canadians of varied ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Winnipeg Tribune fonds
The Winnipeg Tribune, one of western Canada's oldest newspapers, was founded in 1890 by L.R. Richardson and D.L. McIntyre who scraped together $7000 to take over the press and premises of the old Winnipeg Sun. Struggling under the restraints of outdated equipment and no telegraph service, the new paper survived and with the aid of Winnipeg's growing population and economic boom fast became a viable alternative to the rival Winnipeg Free Press. While primarily regarded as an independent liberal paper covering local events and personalities, the Tribune also reported on national and international news. After 90 years of operation, the Winnipeg Tribune ceased publication unexpectedly in August of 1980 as a result of negotiations between competing newspaper chains.