Doris Saunders fonds
Doris Saunders was born in Winnipeg in 1901. In 1917 she graduated from Kelvin High School and then enrolled at the University of Manitoba, where in 1921 she graduated with Gold Medals in both Philosophy and English. Upon graduation, she taught at a rural elementary school before heading to Oxford. After graduating from Oxford with a Diploma of Education in 1923 she taught at both Machray Junior High and Kelvin High School. In 1925, while still teaching, she completed a MA at the University of Manitoba. In 1928, Saunders became the first female appointed to the Department of English at the University of Manitoba and in 1959 became the first female full Professor in the Faculty of Arts. From 1933 to 1945 she was the Dean of Junior Women and was the Registrar of University College from 1964 to 1968, when she retired. Doris Saunders passed away in 2001. The digitized material from the Doris Saunders fonds consists of copies of an address Saunders gave titled "Continuing Education for Women in Canada."
Faculty of Nursing fonds
The first nursing course at the University of Manitoba was offered in 1944, the result of a Government of Canada grant to the Canadian Nurses Association for nursing education. Six years later the School of Nursing was established. In 1959 the first degree program in nursing was discussed and three years later the first students were accepted. In 1963 a four year program leading to a Bachelor of Nursing was initiated. The program was revamped in 1975 to study public health and to concentrate on illness prevention. By 1980 a Masters program had been developed, and in 1984 the Manitoba Nursing Research Institute was established at the University of Manitoba. The School of Nursing received faculty status in 1992. The digitized material from the Faculty of Nursing fonds consists of textual records pertaining to seminars on women in the field of nursing.
Helen Glass fonds
Dr. Helen Glass was born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1917. She received a Bachelor of Nursing degree from Teachers' College, Columbia University in 1960, followed by an M.A., a M.Ed, and finally a Ph.D. of Education in 1971, also from Columbia. She began teaching nursing courses at the University of Manitoba in 1953. Devoted to enhancing the profession of nursing and the quality of medical care, Glass was founder of the Manitoba Nursing Research Institute, President of the Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses, President of the Canadian Nurses Association and first Vice-President of the International Council of Nurses. She served on the Canadian Delegation to the World Health Assembly in 1983 and again in 1985. Dr. Helen Glass retired officially from the School of Nursing in 1986. She is currently Professor Emerita at the University of Manitoba. The digitized material from the Helen Glass fonds consists of textual records pertaining to Glass' education at Columbia Teachers' College, her teaching and administrative work at the University of Manitoba, and her work with professional nursing associations.
Jennifer Shay fonds
Dr. Jennifer Shay (nee Walker) was born in 1930, in Hull, England. Upon graduation from Newland High School in 1948, Dr. Shay attended London University where she obtained a B.Sc. in 1952. She briefly worked at the Flatford Mill Field Centre in Suffolk but moved to Canada in 1957 where she worked as a research associate at the University of Manitoba. At the U of M, Dr. Shay completed a M.Sc. in 1959 and a Doctor of Philosophy in Science in 1964, while lecturing for the Department of Botany. She became a full professor in 1975. In 1966, she was appointed founding director of the Delta Marsh Field Station, a position she held until 1986. In addition, she fulfilled a joint appointment in the Departments of Landscape Architecture and Botany from 1975 to 1986 and again from 1989 to 1993. Although Dr. Shay retired in 1993, she remained a Senior Scholar and was awarded the title Professor Emerita in 1995. The digitized material from the Jennifer Shay fonds consists of annual reports of Shay's teaching activities.
Marie Barton fonds
Marie Barton (nee Rossander) was born in Huntofte, Denmark in 1905. In 1911, she immigrated with her family to Kerrobert, Saskatchewan. She married Leonard Barton in 1928. Overcoming the barriers that existed for married women, Barton taught for four more years to help buy a farm in Davidson, Saskatchewan. The prairie drought of the 1930s drove her and her family from their Davidson farm to a farm at Togo, Saskatchewan and then to Camperville, Manitoba. In 1943, following the death of her husband, Marie returned to teaching to support her four children. In 1955 she graduated from the University of Manitoba with her Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education degrees. Marie taught for several decades in Manitoba, first in country schools in the Dauphin area and then in Winnipeg where she managed the pilot program for Junior High School visually impaired students until her retirement in 1970. Marie Barton passed away in 1999. The digitized material from the Marie Barton fonds consists of textual and photographic records pertaining to Ms. Barton's teaching career, including her work with visually-impaired children.
University of Manitoba Glee Club
The first meeting of the University of Manitoba Glee Club was held on Thursday 9 October 1924 and F.W. Armstrong was elected as the Club's first President. The Glee Club garnered many accolades for its musical performances and set designs. This exhibit includes performance programs, photographs, and a Glee Club scrapbook with photographs, newspaper clippings and playbills. The material is selected from the University of Manitoba Glee Club fonds (UA SC 15), the University of Manitoba Glee Club collection (MSS 347), and the University Relations and Information Office fonds (PC 80). It reflects the activities of the University of Manitoba Glee Club, the University Dramatic Society (a precursor), and theatre productions at the university.
University of Manitoba Students' Union fonds
In 1906, a students' union was organized as part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. In 1907, the Student Representative Council was organized by the University Council, but it was not until 1919 that the University of Manitoba Students' Union (U.M.S.U.) was officially sanctioned. The U.M.S.U. Constitution was written in 1940 and featured the following objectives: to supply students with extra-curricular activities, to facilitate personal contracts, to keep students informed on U.M.S.U. decisions, to bring the University into closer contact with the public, to attain continuity of student government, to act as an effective lobby to the Provincial government, to make academic proposals, and to work for the erection of a students' building. U.M.S.U. is under the control of a Council made up of student representatives from various faculties, schools, colleges, and residences on campus. The President and Vice-President hold the highest administrative posts in U.M.S.U. and are flanked by the Directors of Student Services, Administration, Communication, and Programming.