Ed Kleiman fonds
Ed Kleiman was a lecturer with the English Department of the University of Manitoba. He was an Associate Professor at the time of his retirement in 1996. Beyond his academic career, Kleiman found time to write three books of short stories and numerous articles. His first book The Immortals, published by Newest Press in 1980, delves into the lives of families living in Winnipeg's ethnic and culturally diverse North End. Eight years later A New-Found Ecstasy was published by Newest Press and in 1998 The World Beaters was published by Thistledown Press. The digitized material from the Ed Kleiman fonds includes several manuscripts of short stories written by Kleiman that detail the immigrant experiences of varying nationalities and ethnicities, primarily set in Winnipeg's north end.
Lewis St. George Stubbs fonds
Lewis St. George Stubbs was born on June 14, 1878 in the Turks & Caicos Islands, British West Indies. He left Cambridge University, where he was studying to become a medical missionary, to fight in the Boer War 1900-1901. He immigrated to Winnipeg in 1902 and was called to the Manitoba Bar Association in 1906. In 1908 he and his wife moved to Birtle, Manitoba where he practiced law for fourteen years. In 1921 he ran unsuccessfully for the Liberal Party against T.A. Crerar the leader of the Progressive Party in the federal riding of Marquette. In April 1922 he became the first judicial appointment of the newly appointed Mackenzie King and moved back to Winnipeg. Stubbs was removed from the bench by order-in-council June 1, 1933 following an inquiry into his judicial conduct. A month later he won the nomination to become the C.C.F. party’s first candidate in a bye-election in the riding of Mackenzie in Saskatchewan. He lost the election and returned to the practice of law in Winnipeg. In 1936 Stubbs ran as an independent candidate in the provincial election and swept the polls with the greatest electoral majority ever recorded in the Manitoba Legislature. He won re-election in 1941 and 1945. Stubbs was active in many left leaning/united front political organizations. The digitized material from the Lewis St. George Stubbs fonds consists of correspondence between Stubbs and his family in the Turks and Caicos Islands, detailing his immigration to England and to Canada.
Mary A. Wawrykow fonds
Mary A. Wawrykow, a prominent judge and community leader of Winnipeg, was the first woman of Ukrainian origin to practice law in Canada, and only the third Manitoba woman. She was born in Wakaw, Saskatchewan in 1911. Her parents Mykyta and Anna Zakus had emigrated from Ukraine and settled on the Canadian prairies. Mary graduated from the University of Manitoba Faculty of Law in 1934. She started practicing law in Gimli, Manitoba in 1940. Prior to that, from 1936-1940, she was employed in the Attorney General's Dept. In 1942 she and her husband moved to Winnipeg where she became a prominent figure in the law community. In 1955 she became president of the Women Lawyers Association of Manitoba and was named “Women of the Year” by the Winnipeg Tribune. In 1959 she ran for the Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba in the provincial constituency of Inkster. She was appointed Queen’s Counsel in 1965. The Roblin government appointed her a part-time judge of the Winnipeg juvenile and family court in 1968 and in 1975 Mary was appointed a judge responsible for the Provincial Judges’ Court of Winnipeg (North). She was very active in many Ukrainian Canadian organizations. The digitized material from the Mary Wawrykow fonds consists of photographs of Mary Wawrykow's family, of several Ukrainian women organizations, and of St. Joseph's Parish.
Per Holting fonds
Per (pronounced "Pier") Holting was born in Denmark, 1930. While traveling on a temporary U.S. visitor's visa he arrived in Canada in 1950 where he settled for the rest of his life. He worked as a researcher for a power company in Ontario before pursuing formal training in journalism. In 1956 he graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism. He also became a Canadian citizen that year. Holting worked for 30 years as a freelance journalist and broadcaster doing most of his work for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Many of his writing assignments were published in Macleans Reports. Holting also enjoyed doing radio and television programs for children such as Vacation Time and Stop, Look and Listen. The digitized material from the Per Holting fonds consists of drafts of Holting's autobiography, including his immigration experience, and his Canadian citizenship papers.