Angus Shortt fonds
Angus Shortt was well-known Winnipeg artist and painter of wildlife art. Due to his mother’s influence as an artist, he developed a love for sketching birds around the Silver Heights farm located near the family home. In 1926, determined to find employment as an artist, Shortt sought a position at Brigden’s, a commercial art firm. Despite his desire to become an illustrator, Brigden’s offered him an apprenticeship as a wood engraver, which he accepted. As part of the apprenticeship, Shortt was sent to the Winnipeg School of Art, where he studied under L. LeMoine Fitzgerald. Thereafter Shortt chose to work for the newly formed Ducks Unlimited Canada as an artist in the public relations department. He worked at Ducks Unlimited for thirty-four years (1939-1973). There he specialized in painting ducks and geese and donated his painting to many Ducks Unlimited fund-raisings. Angus Shortt also designed series of the Manitoba wildflower and bird paintings, series of 12 medallions featuring designs based on provincial wildflowers for Canada's Centennial, series of greeting cards depicting a variety of ducks, and sets of playing cards with wildlife illustrations for the U.S. Playing Card Co., Ohio. He illustrated Treasure of Waterfowl (1946), Birds of Colorado (1965), and Ducks and Men: Forty Years of Co-operation in Conservation (1978). He also contributed to the making of eighteen films for Ducks Unlimited. Ducks Unlimited named a lake after him (Shortt Lake) to honor his longtime work. In 1962, he designed a fifteen cent stamp for the post office department. After his retirement, Shortt continued to accept commissions for paintings into the 1990s but in his later years only painted for his own enjoyment.
Bertram Brooker fonds
Bertram Brooker was born in Surrey, England in 1888. He immigrated to Portage la Prairie, Manitoba with his parents in 1905. At age seventeen he worked in the kitchens and in the timekeeper's office of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Later he managed a movie theatre in Neepawa and did newspaper work in Portage and Winnipeg. In 1921 he moved to Toronto to assume a career in advertising and freelance journalism. Brooker began writing his first novel at the age of nine, and as early as 1910 he was writing and directing several of his own plays. His literary achievements include Think of the Earth (1936), Tangled Miracle (1936) and The Robber (1949). He won the first Governor General's Award for fiction in 1936. Although he was the author of nine books as well as texts on advertising and writing, Brooker is perhaps best known as an artist. He began painting in the 1920s and formed close ties with LeMoine Fitzgerald and most of the members of the Group of Seven. Apparently influenced by Fitzgerald and Lawren Harris, he became a pioneer in abstract painting.
Brigden Family fonds
Brigden's Limited, one of Toronto's oldest graphic arts firms, was founded by the English immigrant Frederick Brigden in the early 1880s after he purchased the Toronto Engraving Company from his business partners. Soon after, Frederick's seventeen-year-old son George came into the business. Brigden's began producing illustrations for the Eaton's catalogue in 1893, an association which continued for many years. In 1903, Arnold O. Brigden, Frederick's nephew, came out from England to apprentice in the engraving trade and he remained as an apprentice with the Toronto company until 1908. In 1905, William H. Brigden, a younger brother of Frederick's and a master printer came out to Canada. At that time, Brigden's purchased a platen press and installed it in their Toronto premises. In 1914 Frederick's son, Frederick H., was sent out to Winnipeg to locate suitable premises for a branch operation. Their major Winnipeg client was to be the Western Canadian version of the Eaton's catalogue. After a period working in New York, Arnold was induced to take over management of Brigden's Winnipeg. Frederick Brigden passed away in 1917 and his sons George and Frederick H. took over the Toronto business. The third generation of Brigden's, George's son Geldard, came into the business in 1920. George passed away in 1941 and Frederick H. retired from active management of the company. Arnold O. Brigden retired from active management of Brigden's Winnipeg in 1956.
C. Winston McQuillin fonds
C. Winston McQuillin was a prominent figure in Winnipeg’s amateur theatre scene in the 1920s. The Little Theatre located on Main Street was host to the majority of his theatre career. On this stage he acted in plays such as The Farmer’s Wife and Mr. Pim Passes By. He received critical acclaim for his role as “Oswald” in Ibsen’s Ghosts alongside the Winnipeg Community Players. Amongst his directing credits is the University of Manitoba Menorah Theatre Society’s production of Disraeli. McQuillin’s contributions to Winnipeg theatre aided in the establishment of the Manitoba Theatre Centre. The fonds consists of newsclippings detailing C. Winston McQuillin's theatre career.
Community Players of Winnipeg fonds
Two lawyers, H.A.V. Green and C. Alan Crowley, established The Community of Players of Winnipeg as an amateur theatre group in 1921. Their mandate included providing facilities for the production of plays written by Canadian authors as well as providing Canadian playwrights and Canadian players the opportunity to practice their art and obtain national recognition. Support for the theatre group came in the form of memberships and subscriptions. The Community Players offered four major productions every season and often mounted additional productions. The change of name from the Community Players to Winnipeg Little Theatre must have occurred after 1932 although the date is not clearly defined. The fonds consists of programmes from 1923-1930, newspaper clippings, Treasurer's Reports of the 1927 and 1928 season, The Bill from 1928 to 1937, Little Theatre Gossip, correspondence, typescripts of speeches and historical summaries.
Edward Swiecicki fonds
In 1959, Edward Swiecicki and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. The digitized material from the Edward Swiecicki fonds consists of correspondence between Edward Swiecicki and the Very Reverend Monsignor J. Marty regarding the completion of the Grotto in Cook's Creek, Manitoba following the death of the architect, Father Philip Ruh. A photograph of the Grotto in Lourdes, France is also included.
Elizabeth Maude Macvicar fonds
A successful painter of portrait miniatures in water colour on ivory, Winnipeg-born Elizabeth Maude Macvicar's (1881-1965) output included private commissions, solo and group juried exhibitions, as well as private exhibitions of her work throughout Canada, and at least once in the United States, during a career that flourished during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. Macvicar attended the Winnipeg School of Art and studied miniature painting on ivory in London, England, visiting the famous Wallace Collection of miniatures in that city, and also touring Italy. A member of the Manitoba Society of Artists, she exhibited her work in the group and juried annual exhibitions of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1922, 1923, 1925 and 1927; in the first "open exhibit" of the Manitoba Society of Artists in 1926; at a Hart House exhibition at the University of Toronto in 1930; and in numerous private exhibitions in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, London, Ontario, Winnipeg, and Vancouver. She completed private commissions in all of these cities, as well as in Victoria, Seattle and New York. Macvicar was commissioned to paint a miniature of His Excellency, Lord Willingdon, Governor General of Canada, 1926-1931. She also enjoyed working with children and completed scores of miniature portraits on ivory of the sons and daughters of the wealthy and well-connected. She also painted miniatures of service men and women during the Second World War, as well as large water colour portraits of Canadian women in the services.
Faculty of Agriculture fonds
Manitoba Agricultural College was formerly opened in 1906. In the following year, Manitoba Agricultural College became affiliated with the University of Manitoba so that the degree in agriculture could be conferred on students who had successfully completed the five-year course. However, the affiliation of Manitoba Agricultural College with the University was terminated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1912 when the College was granted degree conferring powers. However, in 1916, the Act was amended and the affiliation between the College and University was restored again. The University of Manitoba conferred the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A) for the first time in May 1911. Regular instruction in Home Economics began the same year and the degree of Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.) was first conferred in May 1918. On March 1, 1924, by Act of the Manitoba Legislature, the administration of Manitoba Agricultural College was transferred to the Board of Governors of the University and it was arranged that in future, the instructional work of the College could be carried on as a Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics of the University. The length of the degree courses in both Agriculture and Home Economics was reduced to four sessions in 1927-1928 to conform with the other university faculties. In 1929, the Legislature selected the site in Fort Garry, already occupied by the Manitoba Agricultural College since 1913, as the permanent site of the university. A systematic program of work in the field of rural adult education was begun in 1940. By 1941, the Faculty consisted of six departments: Animal Science, Bacteriology and Animal Pathology, Dairy Husbandry, Entomology, Plant Science ,and Soils. In 1946, the Department of Agricultural Engineering was added to the faculty. In 1966, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea, twenty kilometers south of Winnipeg. In 1970, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics separated into two independent faculties, Agriculture and Home Economics. Beginning in 1971, the Faculty of Agriculture, through sponsorship from the provincial government, became involved with various foreign aid programs. This culminated in 1979 when the Canadian International Development Agency (C.I.D.A.) financed a joint agricultural program with the University of Zambia. In July 1991, the Faculty became the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.
Faculty of Human Ecology fonds
The present Faculty of Human Ecology traces its beginnings to a diploma in Household Sciences in 1910 at the Manitoba Agricultural College. The Diploma program became a degree in Home Economics in 1915. Three years later, Mary Kelso was named first Director of Home Economics. In 1924, the Manitoba Agricultural College became the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics at the University of Manitoba. In 1943, the Division of Home Economics became the School of Home Economics, but remained within the Faculty of Agriculture. In 1950, the School of Home Economics moved back into its original building following renovations, ending 26 years of residence in temporary buildings. The Departments of Food and Nutrition and Clothing and Textiles were created in 1967. The School of Home Economics was not granted official faculty status until 1970, ending a 60-year tie with the Faculty of Agriculture. In the following year, a Department of Family Studies was created with Dr. Lola Jackson as Head. The Faculty changed its name in 1981 to Human Ecology, reflecting the diversification of curricula. The next year saw the creation of a Bachelor degree in Human Ecology and, in 1983, a Ph.D. in Food and Nutritional Sciences was offered in conjunction with the Faculty of Agriculture.
Henry Kalen fonds
Henry Kalen was a Manitoba-born architect and photographer. Kalen worked as an architect until 1960 when he enlisted in Art Education at the Illinois Institute of Technology to become a professional photographer. He joined the University of Manitoba Faculty of Architecture where in addition to teaching photography he assisted in teaching Architectural Drawing, Graphical Presentation, and Fundamentals of Design between 1960 and 1971. Kalen started his own photography and postcard distribution company. His stock photographs were used in publications such as Maclean's, Chatelaine, and Canadian Geographic. His book, Henry Kalen's Winnipeg, was a local best-seller for many years.
John Zborowsky fonds
In 1959, John Zborowsky Jr. and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. Zborowsky served as Grand Knight from 1962 to 1963, compiling documentation of project expenses, funds raised, photos of various stages in the effort, work schedules, newspaper clippings, and related records. The digitized material from the John Zborowsky fonds consists of nearly 20 photographs illustrating the construction of the Lourdes Calvary Grotto and the Ukrainian Catholic church in Cook's Creek, Manitoba, as well as a photograph of St. Joseph's Ukrainian Catholic church in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Josiah Jones Bell fonds
Josiah Jones Bell was an Ensign with the Ontario Battalion in Colonel Garnet Wolseley's Red River Expedition of 1870. The expedition was intended to exert Canadian sovereignty in the newly created Province of Manitoba. The digitized material from the Josiah Jones Bell fonds consists of several photographs taken by Bell during his travels with the Wolseley Expedition. The photographs depict several of the buildings located in the Red River Valley region during this time.
Kip Park fonds
Christopher "Kip" Park worked in the journalism and communications fields from the late-1960s until shortly before his death in 1999. The bulk of his life and career was based in Winnipeg, where he worked as a freelance journalist. Park worked for the Winnipeg Tribune, the Manitoban, and published regular articles in The Manitoba Co-operator and The Winnipeg Real Estate News. Park was also an avid photographer. The digitized material from the Kip Park fonds consists of nearly 1500 newspaper clippings, research notes, and photographs pertaining to articles Park wrote on the topic of Winnipeg's architectural history.
Leo Mol fonds
Leo Mol is well known for modeling over one hundred portraits among them are such famous personalities as D. Eisenhower, Winston Churchill, Pope John II, Allan Eastman, Y. Hnizdovsky, the Group of Seven painters and many more. He received several commissions from the Canadian Government, the Provincial Government of Manitoba and Alberta, the University of Manitoba and Ukrainian University in Rome. Leo Mol also participated in many national and international competitions such as monuments to John Diefenbaker, Max Bell and Shevchenko monuments in Buenos Aires (1971) and St. Petersburg (2001). Mol executed over 90 stained glass windows for churches in Manitoba. The most famous one is the Saints Volodymyr and Olha Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral in Winnipeg. In the 1970’s Mol produced large life-sized figures of women. These nudes are his masterpieces “Hope”, “Dream”, “Europa”, “Balance”, “Negro Girl” and many more. During his artistic life he also created drawings of nudes. Mol was predominantly a sculptor but he was also a painter who created many beautiful paintings and drawings. His paintings depict Canadian and European landscapes. In 1989 Mol decided to donate his personal art collection to the city of Winnipeg. The Leo Mol Garden was officially opened in 1992.
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald fonds
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald was born in Winnipeg and received his early art instruction at the Keszthelyi School of Fine Art. Later he was employed as a commercial artist with Stovel Company and Eaton's display department. In 1921, he studied at the Art Students' League in New York and that same year held his first exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He joined the staff of the Winnipeg School of Art in 1924 and in 1929 became its Principal. In 1932, he was invited to become a member of the Group of Seven following the death of J.E.H. MacDonald. When the Group disbanded, FitzGerald became a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters. FitzGerald was a highly respected teacher as well as a versatile artist skilled in such various media as oils, watercolors, charcoal, pen, and crayon. He also embossed in copper and sculpted. His early works were of the prairies and his immediate surroundings. Later he turned to still life and still later to abstracts. FitzGerald retired in 1949 and received an honorary degree from the University of Manitoba in 1952. He died in 1956 and a memorial exhibition, mounted by the National Gallery, opened in Winnipeg in 1958 and subsequently toured the major galleries in the country.
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald fonds (WAG)
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald was born in Winnipeg and received his early art instruction at the Keszthelyi School of Fine Art. Later he was employed as a commercial artist with Stovel Company and Eaton's display department. In 1921, he studied at the Art Students' League in New York and that same year held his first exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He joined the staff of the Winnipeg School of Art in 1924 and in 1929 became its Principal. In 1932, he was invited to become a member of the Group of Seven following the death of J.E.H. MacDonald. When the Group disbanded, FitzGerald became a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters. FitzGerald was a highly respected teacher as well as a versatile artist skilled in such various media as oils, watercolors, charcoal, pen, and crayon. He also embossed in copper and sculpted. His early works were of the prairies and his immediate surroundings. Later he turned to still life and still later to abstracts. FitzGerald retired in 1949 and received an honorary degree from the University of Manitoba in 1952. He died in 1956 and a memorial exhibition, mounted by the National Gallery, opened in Winnipeg in 1958 and subsequently toured the major galleries in the country. This digital collection also includes material from the Winnipeg Art Gallery Archives as part of the Prairie Prestige project.
Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk fonds
Maxim Hermaniuk served as the first Metropolitan of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of Canada from 1956 until 1993. Throughout this appointment Hermaniuk sat on many prominent commissions and councils and worked tirelessly to meet the religious, cultural and social needs of the Ukrainian Catholic community. The digitized material from the Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk fonds consists of several photographs of Ukrainian Catholic churches and church facilities in Manitoba.
Nan Shipley fonds
Nan Shipley published fourteen books and numerous short stories and articles. Her first book, Anna and the Indians (1955), has been reprinted many times. Among her better known publications are Frances and the Crees (1957), The Railway Builders (1965), The James Evan Story (1966), and Churchill: Canada’s Northern Gateway (1974). As a big supporter of Aboriginal and Metis culture, she organized Manitoba’s first Indian handicrafts sales centre (1959) and focused her writing on Indian and Metis women. Her photograph collection depicts hydro and railroad developments in northern Manitoba and of the growth and demise of northern towns and settlements. Among the portraits are native peoples and early missionaries and settlers.
Neepawa Film Collection
Collection consists of films created to document events or activities in the town of Neepawa. The digitized material from the Neepawa Film Collection consists of home-movie footage shot by Roy McGillivray documenting the progress of the 1966 fire of St. Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church, which was built on Mountain Road during 1923-1925, as well as the appearance of the site the following winter, and the building used as a temporary facility by the congregation.
Prairie Theatre Exchange fonds
The Prairie Theatre Exchange occupies an important place in the cultural and educational life of Winnipeg. In 1958, two of the city's oldest theatrical organizations, Theatre 77 and the Winnipeg Little Theatre, merged to form the Manitoba Theatre Centre (M.T.C.). The M.T.C. set out to provide a better public service through improved professional productions, more new plays, and the development of future artists, which John Hirsch and Tom Hendry were instrumental in developing. In 1960, the M.T.C. formed the Manitoba Theatre School to emphasize its educational mission, but after twelve successful years the School was closed due to lack of funding. In 1973, however, through an effort spearheaded by Colin Jackson and Charles Huband, the Manitoba Theatre Workshop (M.T.W.) was opened as a replacement to the Manitoba Theatre School. The M.T.W. supported creative expression in the community through its school, its outreach program, and its theatre by encouraging local playwrights and performers. In 1981, the organization changed its name to the Prairie Theatre Exchange while reaffirming its original objectives. In December 1988, the Prairie Theatre Exchange realized a major objective when it was approved as a Teaching Centre by the University of Manitoba. In 1989, after realizing long and steady growth, the P.T.E. moved from its original home on 160 Princess Street (the old Grain Exchange Building) into its new $3.5 million facility comprising 42,500 square feet in the Portage Place Mall in downtown Winnipeg. This collection features photographs of past Prairie Theatre Exchange productions and their performers.
Roslyn Stanwick fonds
Roslyn Stanwick, native of Cook’s Creek, Manitoba, took digital photographs of the Cook's Creek Ukrainian Catholic Church and Grotto to illustrate a seminar presentation for a University of Winnipeg course. She was comparing the original Grotto in Lourdes, France with the Cook’s Creek Grotto, designed and undertaken by Rev. Philip Ruh, OMI, in 1954, in central Manitoba. The digitized material from the Roslyn Stanwick fonds consists of several digital photographs of the Lourdes Grotto and the Ukrainian Catholic church in Cook's Creek, Manitoba. Both structures were designed by Father Philip Ruh.
Stobie Family fonds - Theatre, Ballet and Concert Programs
William and Margaret Stobie were English professors at the University of Manitoba with strong connections to the local and national theatre communities. William served a term as President of the Winnipeg Little Theatre Group. Margaret spent several years acting, producing and directing local theatre as well as working for the CBC in various dramatic roles. This digital collection consists of theatre, ballet and concert programs dating from 1936 to 1979 collected by the Stobie's. Included are programs from the Winnipeg Little Theatre Group, Shoestring Theatre, University of Manitoba Stage and Glee Clubs, Children's Theatre, Manitoba Drama Festival, Winnipeg Summer Theatre Association, Manitoba Drama League, Theatre 77, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra, and many more.
University Relations and Information Office fonds
The University Relations and Information Office was created in 1958 to publicize events at the University of Manitoba through various forms of media. Operating directly under the authority of the President, the Office prepared articles, press releases and public displays. The Office financed Alumni Association activities and publications such as the Alumni Journal. Eventually the Alumni Association assumed the public relations arm for University alumni while internal University news was covered by the Information Office through publication of the bi-monthly newspaper, The Bulletin. In 1960, secretarial staff was added to the Office, and the Public Relations Officer and Information Assistant became the Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Associate Editor of the Alumni Journal, respectively.
University of Manitoba Glee Club
The first meeting of the University of Manitoba Glee Club was held on Thursday 9 October 1924 and F.W. Armstrong was elected as the Club's first President. The Glee Club garnered many accolades for its musical performances and set designs. This exhibit includes performance programs, photographs, and a Glee Club scrapbook with photographs, newspaper clippings and playbills. The material is selected from the University of Manitoba Glee Club fonds (UA SC 15), the University of Manitoba Glee Club collection (MSS 347), and the University Relations and Information Office fonds (PC 80). It reflects the activities of the University of Manitoba Glee Club, the University Dramatic Society (a precursor), and theatre productions at the university.
University of Manitoba Students' Union fonds
In 1906, a students' union was organized as part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. In 1907, the Student Representative Council was organized by the University Council, but it was not until 1919 that the University of Manitoba Students' Union (U.M.S.U.) was officially sanctioned. The U.M.S.U. Constitution was written in 1940 and featured the following objectives: to supply students with extra-curricular activities, to facilitate personal contracts, to keep students informed on U.M.S.U. decisions, to bring the University into closer contact with the public, to attain continuity of student government, to act as an effective lobby to the Provincial government, to make academic proposals, and to work for the erection of a students' building. U.M.S.U. is under the control of a Council made up of student representatives from various faculties, schools, colleges, and residences on campus. The President and Vice-President hold the highest administrative posts in U.M.S.U. and are flanked by the Directors of Student Services, Administration, Communication, and Programming.