A.S. Morton Manuscript Collection
Arthur Silver Morton came to the University of Saskatchewan in 1914 and served both as head of the History Department and University Librarian until his retirement in 1940. Upon arriving in Saskatoon, Morton embarked on the study of Western Canadian History and the preservation of the region's historical documents and historic sites. Over the next four decades he published several books. The digitized material from the A.S. Morton Manuscript Collection includes photographs and documents relating to prairie settlement, including pioneer accounts; manuscripts collected by James Frederick Church Wright relating to the Doukhobours in Canada; statements of pioneer settlers; stories of pioneer experiences in Saskatoon; early settlers' reminiscences; documents pertaining to immigration among Hungarians, Mennonites, Icleanders, and Ukrainians; the papers of "New Canadians"; biographies; and the Meilicke papers.
Alpha Omega Society fonds
The Alpha Omega Society was created at the University of Saskatchewan in 1930 to "foster such social and intellectual activities as will bring the students of Ukrainian descent into a closer bond and a clearer understanding within the rest of the University." The digitized material from the Alpha Omega Society fonds consists of a scrapbook that contains photographs and yearly lists of Alpha Omega Society members from inception in 1930-1931. Also included are booklets from graduations and concerts, newspaper clippings from the Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, University of Saskatchewan Sheaf and Ukrainian New Pathway (in Ukrainian) detailing society activities and student achievements. Correspondence between members, faculty and other individuals are also included in the scrapbook, which was compiled in 1962-1963.
Copland, Hunter and Anderson Family fonds
Margaret Elizabeth Hunter, born 18 April 1849, and William Adam Hunter, born 17 June 1845, married in Dumfrese, Scotland, on 22 December 1870. A year later they emigrated to Canada, settling first in Cayuga, Ontario. In 1883 Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, encouraged them to move west with the Saskatoon Temperance Colonization Society and they built a home at Llewellyn. Margaret and William had 7 children; their two oldest daughters, Mary Kerr Hunter and Barbara Elizabeth Hunter, married brothers from the Anderson family – Burpee James Anderson and Newton Joseph Anderson, respectively. Margaret's brother, Thomas Copland, was one of the first settlers in Saskatoon, and was trained as a chemist and druggist. The University of Saskatchewan is located on his original homestead. The digitized material from the Copland, Hunter and Anderson Family fonds consists of documents that describe the lives of the Copland, Hunter and Anderson families, notably their early years following Margaret and William Hunter's move to Canada and years in Saskatoon. It includes materials relating to events such as the 1885 Resistance; later material documenting student life, at the University, as well as materials documenting the daily life of a pioneering farm family. Included are diaries of Barbara Elizabeth Anderson, nee Hunter (1874-1951) documenting her daily life, 1899-1934 and 1944; memoirs of Mrs. Barbara E. Anderson (covering 1874-1905); and background material.
G.W. Simpson fonds
George Wilfred Simpson's teaching career at the University of Saskatchewan started in 1922, with an appointment as instructor in History. By 1928 he had been promoted to full professor, and, in 1940, Simpson was appointed head of the History Department, a position he held until his retirement in 1958. Upon retirement, Simpson was named Professor Emeritus. During his career at the University of Saskatchewan, Simpson helped initiate the department of Slavic studies, was the first Canadian historian to learn Ukrainian, and edited the first history of the Ukraine published in English. He helped shape the policy of the Saskatchewan Archives Act and was the first Provincial Archivist (1945-1948). The digitized material from the G.W. Simpson fonds consists of files entitled “Ukrainian files” regarding the Ukrainian community in Saskatoon and University of Saskatchewan, 1930-1957; and material relating to Simpson’s association with the Advisory Committee on Co-operation in Canadian Citizenship (Nationalities Branch), 1941-1960.
Marketa Newman fonds
Marketa Newman was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1918. She married Arthur ("Bobek") Neumann (later changed to Newman), and had two children, Karel (changed to Charles or Chuck) and Eva. She and her family were taken to the "model concentration camp", Terezin, in 1942. The family emigrated to Canada in 1949, first staying in Toronto, and settled in Saskatoon in September 1949. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 1962 and a Bachelor of Library Science degree from the University of Toronto in 1964. From 1964 until her retirement in 1985 she worked for the University of Saskatchewan Library in the cataloging, acquisitions, and collection development departments. She was the author of Biographical Dictionary of Saskatchewan Artists - Women Artists and Biographical Dictionary of Saskatchewan Artists - Men Artists. In 1997, largely in recognition of the dictionaries, she received an honorary degree from University of Saskatchewan. The digitized material from the Marketa Newman fonds consists of files relating to immigration to Canada from Czechoslovakia - correspondence and telegrams, including with Nathan Phillips, regarding an Order-in-Council; and subsequent letters to family regarding the immigration experience.
Roman Yereniuk fonds
Roman Yereniuk is an associate professor of St. Andrew’s College and a sessional lecturer in the Centre for Ukrainian Canadian Studies at the University of Manitoba. He teaches courses in Church history of Eastern Christianity and the experience of the Ukrainian Canadians. In addition, he is a school trustee with the Winnipeg School Division. As a creative writer and a storyteller in the Ukrainian Canadian community, Yereniuk has a passion for telling stories about Ukraine, Ukrainian Canadians, and multiculturalism. The digitized material from the Roman Yereniuk fonds consists of film reels of a 1935 rally in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan of the Canadian Ukrainian Youth Association (CYMK). They offer individual and group footage of young Ukrainians from the western region as well as scenes of the prairie city in the mid-thirties. There are some striking frames of the delegates participating in mass calisthenics.
W.C. Murray fonds
Walter Charles Murray started his academic career at the University of New Brunswick, receiving a BA in 1886. After earning a grammar school license at the provincial Normal School, Murray went to University of Edinburgh and received a MA in philosophy in 1891. After a brief period of study in Berlin, Murray returned to UNB as Professor of Philosophy and Economics. From 1892 to 1908, he was Munro Professor of Philosophy and lecturer in Education at Dalhousie University. In 1908 he was appointed the University of Saskatchewan's first President, a position he held until his retirement in 1937. In conjunction with his duties at the University of Saskatchewan, Murray served on a number of commissions, boards and councils. Upon his retirement he was named President Emeritus and remained active in the local community until his death in March 1945. The digitized material from the W.C. Murray fonds consists of correspondence, notes, reports, photos, maps, evidence and lists pertaining to Dr. Murray's activities on three royal commissions and as a judge of the Community Progress Competitions. These Competitions were conceived by the Colonization Department of the C.N.R. to ascertain what contributions people of Continental European origin had made to community life in certain districts, and to what extent they stimulated further community progress and development. The records contain the assessments of the judges on community life on the districts that entered the competition.