Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Winnipeg Chapter fonds
The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.
Canadian Officers Training Corps fonds
With the outbreak of World War I, the University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. On March 1, 1915, the Canadian Officers Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) of the University of Manitoba was established. Eight companies of 60 men of all ranks were formed with Professor E.P. Fetherstonhaugh as captain and adjutant. In 1915, the Western Universities Battalion was formed with the University of Manitoba contributing one company and one platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the First World War, the C.O.T.C. program was reorganized, in 1920, by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean, but it continued in relative obscurity for almost twenty years. With the outbreak of World War II, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed, from its peace time level of 150 to 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or bonuses for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1942, all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory programme of military training. The C.O.T.C. continued the work of military training on a voluntary basis after World War II with new modernized and attractive programmes, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined.
Connie Macmillan Collection
The Connie Macmillan Collection depicts several portraits of Aboriginal Peoples taken in 1880s Winnipeg taken by James D. Hall and Skene Lowe. Hall and Lowe formed a partnership in 1882, creating a photography studio titled "Hall & Lowe, Artists and Photographers". They advertised as selling "Indian photos (taken from life), Xmas cards, views of Winnipeg." The subjects of the photographs were paid for their images and their photographs were advertised for sale in the store's display windows. Hall & Lowe moved to British Columbia in the mid-1880s.
Faculty of Agriculture fonds
Manitoba Agricultural College was formerly opened in 1906. In the following year, Manitoba Agricultural College became affiliated with the University of Manitoba so that the degree in agriculture could be conferred on students who had successfully completed the five-year course. However, the affiliation of Manitoba Agricultural College with the University was terminated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1912 when the College was granted degree conferring powers. However, in 1916, the Act was amended and the affiliation between the College and University was restored again. The University of Manitoba conferred the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A) for the first time in May 1911. Regular instruction in Home Economics began the same year and the degree of Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.) was first conferred in May 1918. On March 1, 1924, by Act of the Manitoba Legislature, the administration of Manitoba Agricultural College was transferred to the Board of Governors of the University and it was arranged that in future, the instructional work of the College could be carried on as a Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics of the University. The length of the degree courses in both Agriculture and Home Economics was reduced to four sessions in 1927-1928 to conform with the other university faculties. In 1929, the Legislature selected the site in Fort Garry, already occupied by the Manitoba Agricultural College since 1913, as the permanent site of the university. A systematic program of work in the field of rural adult education was begun in 1940. By 1941, the Faculty consisted of six departments: Animal Science, Bacteriology and Animal Pathology, Dairy Husbandry, Entomology, Plant Science ,and Soils. In 1946, the Department of Agricultural Engineering was added to the faculty. In 1966, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea, twenty kilometers south of Winnipeg. In 1970, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics separated into two independent faculties, Agriculture and Home Economics. Beginning in 1971, the Faculty of Agriculture, through sponsorship from the provincial government, became involved with various foreign aid programs. This culminated in 1979 when the Canadian International Development Agency (C.I.D.A.) financed a joint agricultural program with the University of Zambia. In July 1991, the Faculty became the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.
Faculty of Human Ecology fonds
The present Faculty of Human Ecology traces its beginnings to a diploma in Household Sciences in 1910 at the Manitoba Agricultural College. The Diploma program became a degree in Home Economics in 1915. Three years later, Mary Kelso was named first Director of Home Economics. In 1924, the Manitoba Agricultural College became the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics at the University of Manitoba. In 1943, the Division of Home Economics became the School of Home Economics, but remained within the Faculty of Agriculture. In 1950, the School of Home Economics moved back into its original building following renovations, ending 26 years of residence in temporary buildings. The Departments of Food and Nutrition and Clothing and Textiles were created in 1967. The School of Home Economics was not granted official faculty status until 1970, ending a 60-year tie with the Faculty of Agriculture. In the following year, a Department of Family Studies was created with Dr. Lola Jackson as Head. The Faculty changed its name in 1981 to Human Ecology, reflecting the diversification of curricula. The next year saw the creation of a Bachelor degree in Human Ecology and, in 1983, a Ph.D. in Food and Nutritional Sciences was offered in conjunction with the Faculty of Agriculture.
Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Resistance)
The Kenneth Hayes fonds, donated to the Archives and Special Collections in 1998, consists of eighteen black and white photographs of which fifteen are originals (taken between 1869 and 1890) and three are photographs of photographs. These photographs depict participants in the North-West Resistance, including Gabriel Dumont and Louis Riel. The fonds also contains four photographic negatives of death certificates, including that of Louis Riel; a telegram; and a letter pertaining to said telegram. Note that this collection was previously called Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Rebellion).
Louis Riel Photograph Collection
Louis Riel was born in Red River and was educated in St. Boniface before being sent to the Petit Séminaire de Montréal. He returned to Red River around 1868 and soon came to lead Métis hostility to the prospective Canadian annexation of the settlement. His direction of the Red River Rebellion as president of the provincial government was marred only by the execution of Thomas Scott, which allowed the Canadian government to name him an outlaw. He was later elected to Parliament from Provencher on several occasions but was expelled. In June 1884, he was asked by a group of settlers in Saskatchewan to lead them in protest against the Canadian government. The protest turned to violence in 1885, and the Métis and indigenous peoples led by Riel were quickly and brutally suppressed after military defeat at the Battle of Batoche. He was tried for treason, rejecting a plea of insanity advanced by his lawyers, and was hanged at Regina on 16 November 1885.