Centre for Settlement Studies fonds
At a meeting in 1966, a group representing several departments of the University of Manitoba expressed a common interest in an interdisciplinary approach to the problems associated with human settlement. Their concern focused primarily on the communities of western and northern Canada. A request for funding, presented to the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, was favourably received resulting in the formation of the Centre for Settlement Studies in 1967 with John E. Page as first Director. Believing that the social and economic problems associated with human settlement might be a limiting factor in the settlement of Canada's northern communities, Page made this topic the first major focus of research. By 1974, the Centre had reached its peak of activity. The Centre for Settlement Studies ceased to function on June 30, 1976, although research projects continued to be published well into 1977. The digital collection includes the Centre's Source Files including drafts of publications, papers and presentations, partially completed projects, analyses, and related data.
Connie Macmillan Collection
The Connie Macmillan Collection depicts several portraits of Aboriginal Peoples taken in 1880s Winnipeg taken by James D. Hall and Skene Lowe. Hall and Lowe formed a partnership in 1882, creating a photography studio titled "Hall & Lowe, Artists and Photographers". They advertised as selling "Indian photos (taken from life), Xmas cards, views of Winnipeg." The subjects of the photographs were paid for their images and their photographs were advertised for sale in the store's display windows. Hall & Lowe moved to British Columbia in the mid-1880s.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee
The Louis Riel Letter to Pierre Lavallee collection consists of a letter written by Louis Riel in 1883 to his friend Pierre Lavallee, the Court Clerk of Marquette-East and the Clerk and Treasurer of the municipality of St. Francois Xavier. The letter discusses the Riel's thoughts on the relationship between the Metis and French Canadians.
Louis Riel Photograph Collection
Louis Riel was born in Red River and was educated in St. Boniface before being sent to the Petit Séminaire de Montréal. He returned to Red River around 1868 and soon came to lead Métis hostility to the prospective Canadian annexation of the settlement. His direction of the Red River Rebellion as president of the provincial government was marred only by the execution of Thomas Scott, which allowed the Canadian government to name him an outlaw. He was later elected to Parliament from Provencher on several occasions but was expelled. In June 1884, he was asked by a group of settlers in Saskatchewan to lead them in protest against the Canadian government. The protest turned to violence in 1885, and the Métis and indigenous peoples led by Riel were quickly and brutally suppressed after military defeat at the Battle of Batoche. He was tried for treason, rejecting a plea of insanity advanced by his lawyers, and was hanged at Regina on 16 November 1885.
Nan Shipley fonds
Nan Shipley published fourteen books and numerous short stories and articles. Her first book, Anna and the Indians (1955), has been reprinted many times. Among her better known publications are Frances and the Crees (1957), The Railway Builders (1965), The James Evan Story (1966), and Churchill: Canada’s Northern Gateway (1974). As a big supporter of Aboriginal and Metis culture, she organized Manitoba’s first Indian handicrafts sales centre (1959) and focused her writing on Indian and Metis women. Her photograph collection depicts hydro and railroad developments in northern Manitoba and of the growth and demise of northern towns and settlements. Among the portraits are native peoples and early missionaries and settlers.
Walter Rudnicki fonds
Walter Rudnicki (Eagle Shield) (1925 - 2010) was a passionate advocate for Aboriginal rights in Canada. For most of his life he worked relentlessly as a public servant and private consultant to improve lives of Canadian Aboriginal Peoples. Rudnicki, as a public servant and a private consultant, worked with both the Government and Aboriginal Peoples revealing problems with their relationship. This collection consists of the reports written by Walter Rudnicki as a private consultant.