Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Winnipeg Chapter fonds
The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.
Emil and Lynette Hain fonds
The Emil and Lynette Hain fonds consists of a collection of glass slides created by Ms. Hain's grandfather, Rev. Thomas Featherstone Watson, who documented the missionary work being undertaken in the Transvaal region of South Africa prior to the onset of the Boer War in 1899. Rev. Watson created glass slides from his original negatives and used them as the basis of his lecture tour titled "Missionary Labours in the Transvaal Before the War: Glimpses of Missionary Life in the Transvaal." The scenes depicted in this digital collection include the South African people, culture and countryside, churches, church services, European and South African ministers, and other glimpses into missionary life in South Africa. The rare and fascinating images in this collection provide some insight into the controversial practice of missionary work in a little-seen region of the world just prior to the outbreak of a violent war only a few years later.
Irene Knysh fonds
Irene Knysh was a feminist, journalist, and author of many books on the Ukrainian women’s movement. Throughout the course of her illustrious writing career, Knysh corresponded with leaders of the Ukrainian women's movement in Canada and the United States, most notably Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, one of the founding members of the Ukrainian National Women's League of America. Knysh also corresponded with famed Ukrainian dance instructor, Vasil' Avramenko. This digital collection features items from the Irene Knysh fonds, many of which were acquired by Knysh during the course of her research. Items featured in the collection include the original record book of the Ukrainian Women's Association of Canada (1930-1931) and photographs of Irene Knysh, Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, members of the National Women's League of America (SUA - Soiuz Ukrainok Ameryky), and Vasil' Avramenko.
McLuhan the Manitoban
Herbert Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) is widely recognized as the pioneer of contemporary media studies, including media literacy. He was brought up in the Fort Rouge area of Winnipeg and received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Manitoba. McLuhan eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge University, and became a professor of English literature, prophetic poet, satirist, and renowned communications visionary & media commentator. Virtually everything for which Marshall McLuhan became internationally renowned was already evident in his public writings as a young man living in Winnipeg and studying at the University of Manitoba. Several articles written for The Manitoban between 1930 and 1934 have been digitized here by The University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections with the permission of the Estate of Marshall McLuhan.
Winnipeg Tribune Personalities Collection
The Winnipeg Tribune Personalities Collection consists of nearly 15,000 photographs of diverse persons of local, national, or international renown, taken by Tribune photographers, which were organized by Tribune staff into alphabetical files by the individuals’ last names. Included in the Personalities Collection are former Canadian Prime Ministers and American Presidents; former Manitoba Premiers; influential Canadians; and, Canadian cultural figures. Many other photographs depict the lives of everyday Manitobans and Canadians and reflect the diversity of Canada’s population through photographs of Canadians of varied ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
Winnipeg Tribune fonds
The Winnipeg Tribune, one of western Canada's oldest newspapers, was founded in 1890 by L.R. Richardson and D.L. McIntyre who scraped together $7000 to take over the press and premises of the old Winnipeg Sun. Struggling under the restraints of outdated equipment and no telegraph service, the new paper survived and with the aid of Winnipeg's growing population and economic boom fast became a viable alternative to the rival Winnipeg Free Press. While primarily regarded as an independent liberal paper covering local events and personalities, the Tribune also reported on national and international news. After 90 years of operation, the Winnipeg Tribune ceased publication unexpectedly in August of 1980 as a result of negotiations between competing newspaper chains.