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Angus Shortt fonds
Angus Shortt was well-known Winnipeg artist and painter of wildlife art. Due to his mother’s influence as an artist, he developed a love for sketching birds around the Silver Heights farm located near the family home. In 1926, determined to find employment as an artist, Shortt sought a position at Brigden’s, a commercial art firm. Despite his desire to become an illustrator, Brigden’s offered him an apprenticeship as a wood engraver, which he accepted. As part of the apprenticeship, Shortt was sent to the Winnipeg School of Art, where he studied under L. LeMoine Fitzgerald. Thereafter Shortt chose to work for the newly formed Ducks Unlimited Canada as an artist in the public relations department. He worked at Ducks Unlimited for thirty-four years (1939-1973). There he specialized in painting ducks and geese and donated his painting to many Ducks Unlimited fund-raisings. Angus Shortt also designed series of the Manitoba wildflower and bird paintings, series of 12 medallions featuring designs based on provincial wildflowers for Canada's Centennial, series of greeting cards depicting a variety of ducks, and sets of playing cards with wildlife illustrations for the U.S. Playing Card Co., Ohio. He illustrated Treasure of Waterfowl (1946), Birds of Colorado (1965), and Ducks and Men: Forty Years of Co-operation in Conservation (1978). He also contributed to the making of eighteen films for Ducks Unlimited. Ducks Unlimited named a lake after him (Shortt Lake) to honor his longtime work. In 1962, he designed a fifteen cent stamp for the post office department. After his retirement, Shortt continued to accept commissions for paintings into the 1990s but in his later years only painted for his own enjoyment.
Anne Yanchyshyn fonds
Anne Yanchyshyn taught in Varennes School for 24 years and after her early retirement she took Oral History workshop classes at the Archives of Manitoba. Anne Yanchyshyn edited the book MPC Flashbacks, a commemorative local history celebrating the 90th Anniversary of the arrival of settlers in Meleb-Park Cumming School District area. In the book she documented the local history of the Ukrainian, Polish as well as the German and Jewish pioneers in the Interlake area. The digitized material from the Anne Yanchyshyn fonds consists of audio recordings of her interviews with Ukrainian and Polish pioneers in the Interlake area, plus printed summations and transcripts of those interviews.
Bertram Brooker fonds
Bertram Brooker was born in Surrey, England in 1888. He immigrated to Portage la Prairie, Manitoba with his parents in 1905. At age seventeen he worked in the kitchens and in the timekeeper's office of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Later he managed a movie theatre in Neepawa and did newspaper work in Portage and Winnipeg. In 1921 he moved to Toronto to assume a career in advertising and freelance journalism. Brooker began writing his first novel at the age of nine, and as early as 1910 he was writing and directing several of his own plays. His literary achievements include Think of the Earth (1936), Tangled Miracle (1936) and The Robber (1949). He won the first Governor General's Award for fiction in 1936. Although he was the author of nine books as well as texts on advertising and writing, Brooker is perhaps best known as an artist. He began painting in the 1920s and formed close ties with LeMoine Fitzgerald and most of the members of the Group of Seven. Apparently influenced by Fitzgerald and Lawren Harris, he became a pioneer in abstract painting.
Brian Macpherson fonds
The Brian Macpherson fonds consists of one wood scrapbook started by the University of Manitoba chapter of the Tau Kappa Epsilon when the fraternity was founded in 1958 to chronicle fraternity events. The unique wooden design was created by a member who was good at woodworking and was intended to be both visually distinct and allow additional pages to be added easily. The use of the scrapbook to keep track of TKE events gradually diminished in the early 1960s.
Brigden Family fonds
Brigden's Limited, one of Toronto's oldest graphic arts firms, was founded by the English immigrant Frederick Brigden in the early 1880s after he purchased the Toronto Engraving Company from his business partners. Soon after, Frederick's seventeen-year-old son George came into the business. Brigden's began producing illustrations for the Eaton's catalogue in 1893, an association which continued for many years. In 1903, Arnold O. Brigden, Frederick's nephew, came out from England to apprentice in the engraving trade and he remained as an apprentice with the Toronto company until 1908. In 1905, William H. Brigden, a younger brother of Frederick's and a master printer came out to Canada. At that time, Brigden's purchased a platen press and installed it in their Toronto premises. In 1914 Frederick's son, Frederick H., was sent out to Winnipeg to locate suitable premises for a branch operation. Their major Winnipeg client was to be the Western Canadian version of the Eaton's catalogue. After a period working in New York, Arnold was induced to take over management of Brigden's Winnipeg. Frederick Brigden passed away in 1917 and his sons George and Frederick H. took over the Toronto business. The third generation of Brigden's, George's son Geldard, came into the business in 1920. George passed away in 1941 and Frederick H. retired from active management of the company. Arnold O. Brigden retired from active management of Brigden's Winnipeg in 1956.
Brown and Gold Yearbooks
The Brown and Gold was the title of the annual yearbook published by the University of Manitoba Students' Union. It was initially published in 1914 and was published annually until 1967. Two volumes were published in the 1970s however after 1967, yearbook publication primarily became the domain of faculties and departments. The Brown and Gold is one of the few sources to document student life on campus, including clubs, societies, athletics, and more. It also lists and provides short biographies of the graduating students for a given year.
C. Winston McQuillin fonds
C. Winston McQuillin was a prominent figure in Winnipeg’s amateur theatre scene in the 1920s. The Little Theatre located on Main Street was host to the majority of his theatre career. On this stage he acted in plays such as The Farmer’s Wife and Mr. Pim Passes By. He received critical acclaim for his role as “Oswald” in Ibsen’s Ghosts alongside the Winnipeg Community Players. Amongst his directing credits is the University of Manitoba Menorah Theatre Society’s production of Disraeli. McQuillin’s contributions to Winnipeg theatre aided in the establishment of the Manitoba Theatre Centre. The fonds consists of newsclippings detailing C. Winston McQuillin's theatre career.
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Winnipeg Chapter fonds
The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.
Canadian Officers Training Corps fonds
With the outbreak of World War I, the University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. On March 1, 1915, the Canadian Officers Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) of the University of Manitoba was established. Eight companies of 60 men of all ranks were formed with Professor E.P. Fetherstonhaugh as captain and adjutant. In 1915, the Western Universities Battalion was formed with the University of Manitoba contributing one company and one platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the First World War, the C.O.T.C. program was reorganized, in 1920, by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean, but it continued in relative obscurity for almost twenty years. With the outbreak of World War II, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed, from its peace time level of 150 to 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or bonuses for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1942, all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory programme of military training. The C.O.T.C. continued the work of military training on a voluntary basis after World War II with new modernized and attractive programmes, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined.
Community Players of Winnipeg fonds
Two lawyers, H.A.V. Green and C. Alan Crowley, established The Community of Players of Winnipeg as an amateur theatre group in 1921. Their mandate included providing facilities for the production of plays written by Canadian authors as well as providing Canadian playwrights and Canadian players the opportunity to practice their art and obtain national recognition. Support for the theatre group came in the form of memberships and subscriptions. The Community Players offered four major productions every season and often mounted additional productions. The change of name from the Community Players to Winnipeg Little Theatre must have occurred after 1932 although the date is not clearly defined. The fonds consists of programmes from 1923-1930, newspaper clippings, Treasurer's Reports of the 1927 and 1928 season, The Bill from 1928 to 1937, Little Theatre Gossip, correspondence, typescripts of speeches and historical summaries.
Connie Macmillan Collection
The Connie Macmillan Collection depicts several portraits of Aboriginal Peoples taken in 1880s Winnipeg taken by James D. Hall and Skene Lowe. Hall and Lowe formed a partnership in 1882, creating a photography studio titled "Hall & Lowe, Artists and Photographers". They advertised as selling "Indian photos (taken from life), Xmas cards, views of Winnipeg." The subjects of the photographs were paid for their images and their photographs were advertised for sale in the store's display windows. Hall & Lowe moved to British Columbia in the mid-1880s.
Dieter Roger fonds
Dieter Roger's works are primarily concerned with German immigrants and their adaptation and contributions to Canadian life. In 2000, Roger published Eckhardt-Gramatte Gedenkschrift fur das Familiengrab in Berlin-Wilhelmhagen, a monograph detailing the pre-immigration life of the Eckhardt-Grammate family of Winnipeg and their familial grave site in Germany. Roger has served as president of the Manitoba chapter of the German-Canadian Historical Association and has published books and articles in both English and German. The digitized material from the Dieter Roger fonds consists of a German newspaper article from the Kanada Kurier, dated 30, September 1999. The article, written in German, is entitled "Denkmalschutz und Ehrengrab: Dr. F. Eckhardts Familien-grabmal in Berlin," which detailed the pre-immigration life of the Eckhardt-Grammate family of Winnipeg and their familial grave site in Germany.
Dixon, Baker Family fonds
The Dixon family originally settled in Quebec before moving to Manitoba. Margaret Ann Purcell and George William Dixon were both born in Belfast, Ireland in 1858 and 1851, respectively. Both their families immigrated to Kildar in Joliette County, Quebec, where they were married in 1872. They moved to Rounthwaite, Manitoba, where they raised their family of 13 children. Most of their descendants still live in the Brandon area. The digitized material from the Dixon, Baker Family fonds includes genealogical information of the Dixon and Baker families between 1851 and 1963, land title deeds, farm receipts, and photographs of agricultural scenes in the early-twentieth century.
Ed Kleiman fonds
Ed Kleiman was a lecturer with the English Department of the University of Manitoba. He was an Associate Professor at the time of his retirement in 1996. Beyond his academic career, Kleiman found time to write three books of short stories and numerous articles. His first book The Immortals, published by Newest Press in 1980, delves into the lives of families living in Winnipeg's ethnic and culturally diverse North End. Eight years later A New-Found Ecstasy was published by Newest Press and in 1998 The World Beaters was published by Thistledown Press. The digitized material from the Ed Kleiman fonds includes several manuscripts of short stories written by Kleiman that detail the immigrant experiences of varying nationalities and ethnicities, primarily set in Winnipeg's north end.
Edward Swiecicki fonds
In 1959, Edward Swiecicki and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. The digitized material from the Edward Swiecicki fonds consists of correspondence between Edward Swiecicki and the Very Reverend Monsignor J. Marty regarding the completion of the Grotto in Cook's Creek, Manitoba following the death of the architect, Father Philip Ruh. A photograph of the Grotto in Lourdes, France is also included.
Elizabeth Maude Macvicar fonds
A successful painter of portrait miniatures in water colour on ivory, Winnipeg-born Elizabeth Maude Macvicar's (1881-1965) output included private commissions, solo and group juried exhibitions, as well as private exhibitions of her work throughout Canada, and at least once in the United States, during a career that flourished during the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. Macvicar attended the Winnipeg School of Art and studied miniature painting on ivory in London, England, visiting the famous Wallace Collection of miniatures in that city, and also touring Italy. A member of the Manitoba Society of Artists, she exhibited her work in the group and juried annual exhibitions of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1922, 1923, 1925 and 1927; in the first "open exhibit" of the Manitoba Society of Artists in 1926; at a Hart House exhibition at the University of Toronto in 1930; and in numerous private exhibitions in Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, London, Ontario, Winnipeg, and Vancouver. She completed private commissions in all of these cities, as well as in Victoria, Seattle and New York. Macvicar was commissioned to paint a miniature of His Excellency, Lord Willingdon, Governor General of Canada, 1926-1931. She also enjoyed working with children and completed scores of miniature portraits on ivory of the sons and daughters of the wealthy and well-connected. She also painted miniatures of service men and women during the Second World War, as well as large water colour portraits of Canadian women in the services.
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreational Studies fonds
The first program of physical education was offered in 1951 in the Department of Physical Recreation and Athletics. A Bachelor degree in Physical Education was first offered in 1964, reflecting a change in philosophy with physical education as a bona fide educational field. Facilities for the Department of Physical Recreation were lacking until the swimming pool was built in 1965 and, more importantly, when the Frank Kennedy Physical Education Centre was completed in 1972. Facilities were improved when construction commenced on the Max Bell Winter Sports Complex in 1981. A Bachelor of Recreation Studies degree was approved by Senate in April 1981 and Faculty status was achieved in May 1982. In 1990, the Master of Physical Education was changed to the Master of Science. In the spring of 1998, a four-year degree program, the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science, a revised three-year B.P.E. degree, and a Master of Arts in Recreation Studies were approved by the Council on Post-Secondary Education. In September 2004, the degree designation of the Bachelor of Recreation Studies was changed to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and Community Development. In December 2005, Senate approved the name change of the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science degree program to the Bachelor of Kinesiology degree program, which became effective in the fall of 2006. At the same time, the Master's of Science in Exercise and Sport Science was renamed the Master's of Science in Kinesiology. Effective July 2007, the University of Manitoba Board of Governors approved the recommendation to change the Faculty name to the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management.
Frederick Philip Grove fonds
Frederick Philip Grove arrived in Manitoba in September 1912. Although he kept his prior life very much a secret, he was born in 1879 as Felix Paul Greve in Radomno, a small Prussian town on the German-Polish border. In late July 1909 he faked his suicide and immigrated to North America. In Canada, he was a teacher/principal in a variety of rural schools, including Rapid City where he lived for seven years before moving to Ottawa in 1929. There, he joined Graphic Publishers until 1931, when he settled on an estate in Simcoe, Ontario. Grove wrote and his wife Catherine Wiens opened a Froebel Kindergarten. Grove suffered a crippling stroke in 1944 and although he continued to write, his health deteriorated. He died on August 19, 1948. During his Manitoba years between 1919 and 1929, Grove published twelve books, including Over Prairie Trails (1922), The Turn of the Year (1923), Settlers of the Marsh (1925), A Search for America (1927), Our Daily Bread (1928) and It Needs to be Said (1929). He also wrote many short stories, reviews, essays and articles, and a very large number of poems. In Ontario, several more books were published, starting with The Yoke of Life (1930). Fruits of the Earth (1933), Master of the Mill (1944), and his official autobiography In Search of Myself (1946) followed. His "ant-book", the Swiftian satire Consider Her Ways (1947), was published as a fragment. The digitized material from the Frederick Philip Grove fonds includes correspondence with I. Warkentin describing life in Canada in 1913, manuscripts written by Grove describing the experiences of immigrants, documents relating to Grove's Canadian 1921 citizenship, and photographs depicting Grove's home in Ashfield, MB.
Hallama Family fonds
Wenceslaus Hallama settled in Canada in 1891, and purchased land near Grande Pointe from his Uncle Joseph Schwab four years later. He married Barbara Blahnik from Bohemia and they had two children. Wenceslaus was the first farmer in the area to own a seed drill, and a gasoline tractor. In 1938, their only son Joseph took over the farm until 1971. In 1971 his son Edward took over the farm. The digitized material from the Hallama Family fonds consists of photographs, farm account books and a history of the Hallama family and farm.
Hamilton Family fonds
The Hamilton Family fonds details Dr. T.G. (Thomas Glendenning) and Lillian Hamilton's investigations of psychic phenomena in their home in Winnipeg, Manitoba between 1918 and 1945. The images detail numerous aspects of spiritualism including telekinesis, teleplasm, trance states and various other psychic phenomena. This site is comprised of over 700 images from the Hamilton Family photograph collection and over 1300 notes and accompanying documentation pertaining to seances held in the Hamilton's home. The entirety of the photograph collection has been digitized with the exception of duplicate photographs of the same image. It includes digital reproductions of photographs, stereo photographs, slides, negatives and glass slide negatives, as well as some accompanying textual records.
Henry Kalen fonds
Henry Kalen was a Manitoba-born architect and photographer. Kalen worked as an architect until 1960 when he enlisted in Art Education at the Illinois Institute of Technology to become a professional photographer. He joined the University of Manitoba Faculty of Architecture where in addition to teaching photography he assisted in teaching Architectural Drawing, Graphical Presentation, and Fundamentals of Design between 1960 and 1971. Kalen started his own photography and postcard distribution company. His stock photographs were used in publications such as Maclean's, Chatelaine, and Canadian Geographic. His book, Henry Kalen's Winnipeg, was a local best-seller for many years.
John Zborowsky fonds
In 1959, John Zborowsky Jr. and his brother knights of St. Josaphat Council # 4138 of the Knights of Columbus, first committed to assist Fr. Philip Ruh with the Lourdes Grotto project in Cook’s Creek, Manitoba. When Fr. Ruh was on his deathbed in 1962, members of the Council vowed to complete the Lourdes Grotto for him. Organized in work crews, the volunteers laboured for a decade, modeling the structure as much as possible upon the original shrine in Lourdes, France. Zborowsky served as Grand Knight from 1962 to 1963, compiling documentation of project expenses, funds raised, photos of various stages in the effort, work schedules, newspaper clippings, and related records. The digitized material from the John Zborowsky fonds consists of nearly 20 photographs illustrating the construction of the Lourdes Calvary Grotto and the Ukrainian Catholic church in Cook's Creek, Manitoba, as well as a photograph of St. Joseph's Ukrainian Catholic church in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Josiah Jones Bell fonds
Josiah Jones Bell was an Ensign with the Ontario Battalion in Colonel Garnet Wolseley's Red River Expedition of 1870. The expedition was intended to exert Canadian sovereignty in the newly created Province of Manitoba. The digitized material from the Josiah Jones Bell fonds consists of several photographs taken by Bell during his travels with the Wolseley Expedition. The photographs depict several of the buildings located in the Red River Valley region during this time.
Kip Park fonds
Christopher "Kip" Park worked in the journalism and communications fields from the late-1960s until shortly before his death in 1999. The bulk of his life and career was based in Winnipeg, where he worked as a freelance journalist. Park worked for the Winnipeg Tribune, the Manitoban, and published regular articles in The Manitoba Co-operator and The Winnipeg Real Estate News. Park was also an avid photographer. The digitized material from the Kip Park fonds consists of nearly 1500 newspaper clippings, research notes, and photographs pertaining to articles Park wrote on the topic of Winnipeg's architectural history.
Klymkiw Family fonds
Walter (Volodymyr) Klymkiw was born in Saranchuky, Ukraine in 1926. Emigrating to Canada in 1928, he and his parents settled in Winnipeg. In 1950 he earned a B.A. in English and History at the University of British Columbia. He returned a year later to Winnipeg, and received a teaching certificate from the University of Manitoba. In 1951 he began conducting the Ukrainian National Federation Choir (renamed the Olexander Koshetz Choir in 1967) of Winnipeg, under the guidance of Tetiana Koshetz and Pavlo Macenko. Upon receiving his teaching certificate, Klymkiw began his career as a history teacher in 1953 at Glenwood Junior High School. He continued to teach at several schools until his retirement in 1983. Retirement allowed Klymkiw to devote more time as choral director of the Olexander Koshetz Choir. During his nearly fifty years with the choir, Klymkiw and his choir toured throughout Canada, Ukraine, Poland, the Czech Republic, Western Europe, and South America. Besides his choir, Klymkiw and his wife devoted much of their time to various community activities. The digitized material from the Klymkiw Family fonds consists of geneological information and photographs of family members and of certain Ukrainian national organizations.
Leo Mol fonds
Leo Mol is well known for modeling over one hundred portraits among them are such famous personalities as D. Eisenhower, Winston Churchill, Pope John II, Allan Eastman, Y. Hnizdovsky, the Group of Seven painters and many more. He received several commissions from the Canadian Government, the Provincial Government of Manitoba and Alberta, the University of Manitoba and Ukrainian University in Rome. Leo Mol also participated in many national and international competitions such as monuments to John Diefenbaker, Max Bell and Shevchenko monuments in Buenos Aires (1971) and St. Petersburg (2001). Mol executed over 90 stained glass windows for churches in Manitoba. The most famous one is the Saints Volodymyr and Olha Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral in Winnipeg. In the 1970’s Mol produced large life-sized figures of women. These nudes are his masterpieces “Hope”, “Dream”, “Europa”, “Balance”, “Negro Girl” and many more. During his artistic life he also created drawings of nudes. Mol was predominantly a sculptor but he was also a painter who created many beautiful paintings and drawings. His paintings depict Canadian and European landscapes. In 1989 Mol decided to donate his personal art collection to the city of Winnipeg. The Leo Mol Garden was officially opened in 1992.
Lewis St. George Stubbs fonds
Lewis St. George Stubbs was born on June 14, 1878 in the Turks & Caicos Islands, British West Indies. He left Cambridge University, where he was studying to become a medical missionary, to fight in the Boer War 1900-1901. He immigrated to Winnipeg in 1902 and was called to the Manitoba Bar Association in 1906. In 1908 he and his wife moved to Birtle, Manitoba where he practiced law for fourteen years. In 1921 he ran unsuccessfully for the Liberal Party against T.A. Crerar the leader of the Progressive Party in the federal riding of Marquette. In April 1922 he became the first judicial appointment of the newly appointed Mackenzie King and moved back to Winnipeg. Stubbs was removed from the bench by order-in-council June 1, 1933 following an inquiry into his judicial conduct. A month later he won the nomination to become the C.C.F. party’s first candidate in a bye-election in the riding of Mackenzie in Saskatchewan. He lost the election and returned to the practice of law in Winnipeg. In 1936 Stubbs ran as an independent candidate in the provincial election and swept the polls with the greatest electoral majority ever recorded in the Manitoba Legislature. He won re-election in 1941 and 1945. Stubbs was active in many left leaning/united front political organizations. The digitized material from the Lewis St. George Stubbs fonds consists of correspondence between Stubbs and his family in the Turks and Caicos Islands, detailing his immigration to England and to Canada.
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald fonds
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald was born in Winnipeg and received his early art instruction at the Keszthelyi School of Fine Art. Later he was employed as a commercial artist with Stovel Company and Eaton's display department. In 1921, he studied at the Art Students' League in New York and that same year held his first exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He joined the staff of the Winnipeg School of Art in 1924 and in 1929 became its Principal. In 1932, he was invited to become a member of the Group of Seven following the death of J.E.H. MacDonald. When the Group disbanded, FitzGerald became a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters. FitzGerald was a highly respected teacher as well as a versatile artist skilled in such various media as oils, watercolors, charcoal, pen, and crayon. He also embossed in copper and sculpted. His early works were of the prairies and his immediate surroundings. Later he turned to still life and still later to abstracts. FitzGerald retired in 1949 and received an honorary degree from the University of Manitoba in 1952. He died in 1956 and a memorial exhibition, mounted by the National Gallery, opened in Winnipeg in 1958 and subsequently toured the major galleries in the country.
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald fonds (WAG)
Lionel LeMoine FitzGerald was born in Winnipeg and received his early art instruction at the Keszthelyi School of Fine Art. Later he was employed as a commercial artist with Stovel Company and Eaton's display department. In 1921, he studied at the Art Students' League in New York and that same year held his first exhibition in the Winnipeg Art Gallery. He joined the staff of the Winnipeg School of Art in 1924 and in 1929 became its Principal. In 1932, he was invited to become a member of the Group of Seven following the death of J.E.H. MacDonald. When the Group disbanded, FitzGerald became a founding member of the Canadian Group of Painters. FitzGerald was a highly respected teacher as well as a versatile artist skilled in such various media as oils, watercolors, charcoal, pen, and crayon. He also embossed in copper and sculpted. His early works were of the prairies and his immediate surroundings. Later he turned to still life and still later to abstracts. FitzGerald retired in 1949 and received an honorary degree from the University of Manitoba in 1952. He died in 1956 and a memorial exhibition, mounted by the National Gallery, opened in Winnipeg in 1958 and subsequently toured the major galleries in the country. This digital collection also includes material from the Winnipeg Art Gallery Archives as part of the Prairie Prestige project.
Louis Riel Photograph Collection
Louis Riel was born in Red River and was educated in St. Boniface before being sent to the Petit Séminaire de Montréal. He returned to Red River around 1868 and soon came to lead Métis hostility to the prospective Canadian annexation of the settlement. His direction of the Red River Rebellion as president of the provincial government was marred only by the execution of Thomas Scott, which allowed the Canadian government to name him an outlaw. He was later elected to Parliament from Provencher on several occasions but was expelled. In June 1884, he was asked by a group of settlers in Saskatchewan to lead them in protest against the Canadian government. The protest turned to violence in 1885, and the Métis and indigenous peoples led by Riel were quickly and brutally suppressed after military defeat at the Battle of Batoche. He was tried for treason, rejecting a plea of insanity advanced by his lawyers, and was hanged at Regina on 16 November 1885.
MacDonald Family fonds
John Duncan MacDonald and his wife Anne immigrated to Manitoba from Scotland in 1872. John McIntyre MacDonald was one of their nine children. He married Sarah McMillan and they had three children. John Duncan was the second of three, and he married Margaret Greer. They had four children, the second being Robert James. Robert married Edna Thompson in 1948 and they had four children. John McIntyre homesteaded and over time more land was bought around the original homestead and the land was passed on to descendants. The digitized material from the MacDonald Family fonds consists of John D. MacDonald's pocket diary (1912), which detailed the homesteading experience of this Scottish immigrant, and the family history of the MacDonald's.
McLuhan the Manitoban
Herbert Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) is widely recognized as the pioneer of contemporary media studies, including media literacy. He was brought up in the Fort Rouge area of Winnipeg and received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Manitoba. McLuhan eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge University, and became a professor of English literature, prophetic poet, satirist, and renowned communications visionary & media commentator. Virtually everything for which Marshall McLuhan became internationally renowned was already evident in his public writings as a young man living in Winnipeg and studying at the University of Manitoba. Several articles written for The Manitoban between 1930 and 1934 have been digitized here by The University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections with the permission of the Estate of Marshall McLuhan.
Melita and David A. Ennis fonds
The Melita and David A. Ennis fonds consists of 2 scrapbooks featuring photographs depicting life in Churchill, Manitoba between 1929 and 1932. The photographs depict construction projects, settlement communities, rail roads, indigenous peoples, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, and images of northern landscapes. They document the process of mechanization and frontier expansion.
Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk fonds
Maxim Hermaniuk served as the first Metropolitan of the Ukrainian Catholic Church of Canada from 1956 until 1993. Throughout this appointment Hermaniuk sat on many prominent commissions and councils and worked tirelessly to meet the religious, cultural and social needs of the Ukrainian Catholic community. The digitized material from the Metropolitan Maxim Hermaniuk fonds consists of several photographs of Ukrainian Catholic churches and church facilities in Manitoba.
Michael Ewanchuk fonds
Born in 1908 in Gimli, Manitoba, Ewanchuk was the son of pioneer settlers. Upon graduating from Gimli High School he attended the Detroit Institute of Technology and Detroit City College (now Wayne State University). He received his B.A., B.Ed., and M.Ed. degrees from the University of Manitoba - later receiving two honorary Doctoral degrees from the University of Manitoba and the University of Winnipeg. Upon completion of his service with the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1946, he was appointed Inspector of Schools. Ewanchuk served on various curriculum committees and was chairman of a committee that organized the introduction of Ukrainian instruction in the high schools of Manitoba. Interested in oral history, Ewanchuk conducted a series of interviews in the 1930's with Ukrainian seniors and began writing oral histories. He also wrote articles and reports for several Ukrainian papers. He later published several books on Ukrainians, including Spruce, Swamp, and Stone: A History of the Pioneer Ukrainian Settlements in the Gimli Area (1977), Vita: A Ukrainian Community (1977), and Hawaiian Ordeal: Ukrainian Contract Workers 1897-1910 (1986). The digitized material from the Michael Ewanchuk fonds consists of records pertaining to his immigrant family, photographs of Ukrainian immigrant settlers, and audio recordings of his interviews with Ukrainian pioneers.
Neepawa Film Collection
Collection consists of films created to document events or activities in the town of Neepawa. The digitized material from the Neepawa Film Collection consists of home-movie footage shot by Roy McGillivray documenting the progress of the 1966 fire of St. Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church, which was built on Mountain Road during 1923-1925, as well as the appearance of the site the following winter, and the building used as a temporary facility by the congregation.
Per Holting fonds
Per (pronounced "Pier") Holting was born in Denmark, 1930. While traveling on a temporary U.S. visitor's visa he arrived in Canada in 1950 where he settled for the rest of his life. He worked as a researcher for a power company in Ontario before pursuing formal training in journalism. In 1956 he graduated from the University of Western Ontario with a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism. He also became a Canadian citizen that year. Holting worked for 30 years as a freelance journalist and broadcaster doing most of his work for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Many of his writing assignments were published in Macleans Reports. Holting also enjoyed doing radio and television programs for children such as Vacation Time and Stop, Look and Listen. The digitized material from the Per Holting fonds consists of drafts of Holting's autobiography, including his immigration experience, and his Canadian citizenship papers.
Prairie Theatre Exchange fonds
The Prairie Theatre Exchange occupies an important place in the cultural and educational life of Winnipeg. In 1958, two of the city's oldest theatrical organizations, Theatre 77 and the Winnipeg Little Theatre, merged to form the Manitoba Theatre Centre (M.T.C.). The M.T.C. set out to provide a better public service through improved professional productions, more new plays, and the development of future artists, which John Hirsch and Tom Hendry were instrumental in developing. In 1960, the M.T.C. formed the Manitoba Theatre School to emphasize its educational mission, but after twelve successful years the School was closed due to lack of funding. In 1973, however, through an effort spearheaded by Colin Jackson and Charles Huband, the Manitoba Theatre Workshop (M.T.W.) was opened as a replacement to the Manitoba Theatre School. The M.T.W. supported creative expression in the community through its school, its outreach program, and its theatre by encouraging local playwrights and performers. In 1981, the organization changed its name to the Prairie Theatre Exchange while reaffirming its original objectives. In December 1988, the Prairie Theatre Exchange realized a major objective when it was approved as a Teaching Centre by the University of Manitoba. In 1989, after realizing long and steady growth, the P.T.E. moved from its original home on 160 Princess Street (the old Grain Exchange Building) into its new $3.5 million facility comprising 42,500 square feet in the Portage Place Mall in downtown Winnipeg. This collection features photographs of past Prairie Theatre Exchange productions and their performers.
Professional Hockey in Winnipeg
The Professional Hockey in Winnipeg exhibit is a celebration of the history of professional hockey in Winnipeg. Featured are images of players, fans, coaches, management, and community figures that supported or were connected to Winnipeg's professional hockey heritage. Most notable among these are images taken during the era of the Winnipeg Jets, the city's professional hockey team from 1972 to 1996. Photographs from early days of the former Winnipeg Arena inspire nostalgia for a not-so-distant past, and hockey greats such as Bobby Hull and Gordie Howe can be spotted along with various Jets players from the 1970s. This exhibit is composed of content selected from the much larger Winnipeg Tribune Fonds and Henry Kalen Fonds held at the University of Manitoba Archives and Special Collections.
Roslyn Stanwick fonds
Roslyn Stanwick, native of Cook’s Creek, Manitoba, took digital photographs of the Cook's Creek Ukrainian Catholic Church and Grotto to illustrate a seminar presentation for a University of Winnipeg course. She was comparing the original Grotto in Lourdes, France with the Cook’s Creek Grotto, designed and undertaken by Rev. Philip Ruh, OMI, in 1954, in central Manitoba. The digitized material from the Roslyn Stanwick fonds consists of several digital photographs of the Lourdes Grotto and the Ukrainian Catholic church in Cook's Creek, Manitoba. Both structures were designed by Father Philip Ruh.

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