Brown and Gold Yearbooks
The Brown and Gold was the title of the annual yearbook published by the University of Manitoba Students' Union. It was initially published in 1914 and was published annually until 1967. Two volumes were published in the 1970s however after 1967, yearbook publication primarily became the domain of faculties and departments. The Brown and Gold is one of the few sources to document student life on campus, including clubs, societies, athletics, and more. It also lists and provides short biographies of the graduating students for a given year.
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Winnipeg Chapter fonds
The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.
Canadian Officers Training Corps fonds
With the outbreak of World War I, the University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. On March 1, 1915, the Canadian Officers Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) of the University of Manitoba was established. Eight companies of 60 men of all ranks were formed with Professor E.P. Fetherstonhaugh as captain and adjutant. In 1915, the Western Universities Battalion was formed with the University of Manitoba contributing one company and one platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the First World War, the C.O.T.C. program was reorganized, in 1920, by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean, but it continued in relative obscurity for almost twenty years. With the outbreak of World War II, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed, from its peace time level of 150 to 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or bonuses for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1942, all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory programme of military training. The C.O.T.C. continued the work of military training on a voluntary basis after World War II with new modernized and attractive programmes, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined.
Centre for Settlement Studies fonds
At a meeting in 1966, a group representing several departments of the University of Manitoba expressed a common interest in an interdisciplinary approach to the problems associated with human settlement. Their concern focused primarily on the communities of western and northern Canada. A request for funding, presented to the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, was favourably received resulting in the formation of the Centre for Settlement Studies in 1967 with John E. Page as first Director. Believing that the social and economic problems associated with human settlement might be a limiting factor in the settlement of Canada's northern communities, Page made this topic the first major focus of research. By 1974, the Centre had reached its peak of activity. The Centre for Settlement Studies ceased to function on June 30, 1976, although research projects continued to be published well into 1977. The digital collection includes the Centre's Source Files including drafts of publications, papers and presentations, partially completed projects, analyses, and related data.
Emil and Lynette Hain fonds
The Emil and Lynette Hain fonds consists of a collection of glass slides created by Ms. Hain's grandfather, Rev. Thomas Featherstone Watson, who documented the missionary work being undertaken in the Transvaal region of South Africa prior to the onset of the Boer War in 1899. Rev. Watson created glass slides from his original negatives and used them as the basis of his lecture tour titled "Missionary Labours in the Transvaal Before the War: Glimpses of Missionary Life in the Transvaal." The scenes depicted in this digital collection include the South African people, culture and countryside, churches, church services, European and South African ministers, and other glimpses into missionary life in South Africa. The rare and fascinating images in this collection provide some insight into the controversial practice of missionary work in a little-seen region of the world just prior to the outbreak of a violent war only a few years later.
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreational Studies fonds
The first program of physical education was offered in 1951 in the Department of Physical Recreation and Athletics. A Bachelor degree in Physical Education was first offered in 1964, reflecting a change in philosophy with physical education as a bona fide educational field. Facilities for the Department of Physical Recreation were lacking until the swimming pool was built in 1965 and, more importantly, when the Frank Kennedy Physical Education Centre was completed in 1972. Facilities were improved when construction commenced on the Max Bell Winter Sports Complex in 1981. A Bachelor of Recreation Studies degree was approved by Senate in April 1981 and Faculty status was achieved in May 1982. In 1990, the Master of Physical Education was changed to the Master of Science. In the spring of 1998, a four-year degree program, the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science, a revised three-year B.P.E. degree, and a Master of Arts in Recreation Studies were approved by the Council on Post-Secondary Education. In September 2004, the degree designation of the Bachelor of Recreation Studies was changed to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and Community Development. In December 2005, Senate approved the name change of the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science degree program to the Bachelor of Kinesiology degree program, which became effective in the fall of 2006. At the same time, the Master's of Science in Exercise and Sport Science was renamed the Master's of Science in Kinesiology. Effective July 2007, the University of Manitoba Board of Governors approved the recommendation to change the Faculty name to the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management.
Gallery One One One
Gallery One One One was established in 1965 to serve the School of Art and the public, showing and collecting contemporary and historical art. It now exists as the School of Art Gallery and is currently located in the ArtLab.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
John Leslie Charles fonds
Major John Leslie Charles was a Chief Engineer for Candian National Railway's (CN) Western Region and consulting engineer for CN. He later became responsible for much of the engineering and construction in western Canada, northern Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories. In 1926, he was appointed as a transit man for a survey crew and surveyed the second section of the Hudson Bay Railway (Limestone- Fort Churchill). He also published studies of the Great Slave Lake Railway, the first railway to enter the Northwest Territories and the most northerly railway connected to the continental system. The collection includes articles, reports and maps created by Charles regarding Northern Canadian railway routes.
Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Resistance)
The Kenneth Hayes fonds, donated to the Archives and Special Collections in 1998, consists of eighteen black and white photographs of which fifteen are originals (taken between 1869 and 1890) and three are photographs of photographs. These photographs depict participants in the North-West Resistance, including Gabriel Dumont and Louis Riel. The fonds also contains four photographic negatives of death certificates, including that of Louis Riel; a telegram; and a letter pertaining to said telegram. Note that this collection was previously called Kenneth Hayes Collection (North-West Rebellion).
Logan Family fonds
Margaret Frances Logan graduated from Manitoba College in 1900 with a B.A. in Philosophy and received her M.A. in Philosophy in 1904. Never married, she taught at various schools in Saskatchewan (Conquest, Gull Lake, Swift Current) until she retired to her hometown of Lauder, Manitoba. She died in 1974 at the age of 98. The journal was written by Logan as she attended the Singoosh Summer School for Teachers in 1942. This school was affiliated with the University of Manitoba and was located on Singush Lake in Duck Mountain Provincial Park. This journal was donated by Logan’s great-niece, Pat Greenways in 2018.
McLuhan the Manitoban
Herbert Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) is widely recognized as the pioneer of contemporary media studies, including media literacy. He was brought up in the Fort Rouge area of Winnipeg and received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Manitoba. McLuhan eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge University, and became a professor of English literature, prophetic poet, satirist, and renowned communications visionary & media commentator. Virtually everything for which Marshall McLuhan became internationally renowned was already evident in his public writings as a young man living in Winnipeg and studying at the University of Manitoba. Several articles written for The Manitoban between 1930 and 1934 have been digitized here by The University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections with the permission of the Estate of Marshall McLuhan.
Melita and David A. Ennis fonds
The Melita and David A. Ennis fonds consists of 2 scrapbooks featuring photographs depicting life in Churchill, Manitoba between 1929 and 1932. The photographs depict construction projects, settlement communities, rail roads, indigenous peoples, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, and images of northern landscapes. They document the process of mechanization and frontier expansion.
Sandra Barz fonds
Sandra Barz completed her education at Skidmore College graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in 1952. She began her career in publishing and later became interested in Inuit art after purchasing a few pieces while visiting Canada. Thereafter she began to research and compile information relating to Inuit prints from Arctic Quebec/Puvirnituq, Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Clyde River, Holman Island, and Pangnirtung. Her first exploration in this field involved developing, editing, and publishing 28 issues of Arts and Culture of the North from 1976 to 1984. She followed this work with a series of three volumes titled Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volumes I, II, and III. The volumes catalogue over 8,000 Inuit print images dating from 1957 to the present, produced in the aforementioned communities, as well as prints produced independently of the Arctic co-operative system. Barz's papers detail over forty years of dedication to documenting Inuit artist biographies, the evolution of printmaking, and encouraging growing interest for Inuit art worldwide.
University Relations and Information Office fonds
The University Relations and Information Office was created in 1958 to publicize events at the University of Manitoba through various forms of media. Operating directly under the authority of the President, the Office prepared articles, press releases and public displays. The Office financed Alumni Association activities and publications such as the Alumni Journal. Eventually the Alumni Association assumed the public relations arm for University alumni while internal University news was covered by the Information Office through publication of the bi-monthly newspaper, The Bulletin. In 1960, secretarial staff was added to the Office, and the Public Relations Officer and Information Assistant became the Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Associate Editor of the Alumni Journal, respectively.
University of Manitoba Glee Club
The first meeting of the University of Manitoba Glee Club was held on Thursday 9 October 1924 and F.W. Armstrong was elected as the Club's first President. The Glee Club garnered many accolades for its musical performances and set designs. This exhibit includes performance programs, photographs, and a Glee Club scrapbook with photographs, newspaper clippings and playbills. The material is selected from the University of Manitoba Glee Club fonds (UA SC 15), the University of Manitoba Glee Club collection (MSS 347), and the University Relations and Information Office fonds (PC 80). It reflects the activities of the University of Manitoba Glee Club, the University Dramatic Society (a precursor), and theatre productions at the university.
University of Manitoba Students' Union fonds
In 1906, a students' union was organized as part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. In 1907, the Student Representative Council was organized by the University Council, but it was not until 1919 that the University of Manitoba Students' Union (U.M.S.U.) was officially sanctioned. The U.M.S.U. Constitution was written in 1940 and featured the following objectives: to supply students with extra-curricular activities, to facilitate personal contracts, to keep students informed on U.M.S.U. decisions, to bring the University into closer contact with the public, to attain continuity of student government, to act as an effective lobby to the Provincial government, to make academic proposals, and to work for the erection of a students' building. U.M.S.U. is under the control of a Council made up of student representatives from various faculties, schools, colleges, and residences on campus. The President and Vice-President hold the highest administrative posts in U.M.S.U. and are flanked by the Directors of Student Services, Administration, Communication, and Programming.
Walter Eggertson fonds
Walter Eggertson was a Winnipeg-born, Wesley College student at the outbreak of the First World War. In 1916, Eggertson left the college and enlisted in the army. Over the course of his service in England and France with the 223rd and 27th Battalions, Eggertson kept two diaries, documenting his war experiences between 1917 and 1918. The digital material from the Walter Eggertson fonds consists of the transcription for both diaries held by Archives & Special Collections.
Walter Rudnicki fonds
Walter Rudnicki (Eagle Shield) (1925 - 2010) was a passionate advocate for Aboriginal rights in Canada. For most of his life he worked relentlessly as a public servant and private consultant to improve lives of Canadian Aboriginal Peoples. Rudnicki, as a public servant and a private consultant, worked with both the Government and Aboriginal Peoples revealing problems with their relationship. This collection consists of the reports written by Walter Rudnicki as a private consultant.