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"Treaty" and "Status": Opposite Directions
A handwritten draft of an essay, written by Walter Rudnicki, discussing the difference between "Treaty Indians" and "Status Indians". Rudnicki argues that the Canadian government has a vested interest in keeping indigenous peoples thinking of themselves as "Status Indians" and therefore as an assimilated part of Canadian culture. This essay is much rougher and less legible than the related "The Difference Between 'Treaty' and 'Status'", which can be found here: http://syn.lib.umanitoba.ca/fedora/repository/uofm:4676
A Role for Tribal Organization
A short essay, written by Walter Rudnicki in 1988, recommending roles that aboriginal tribal organisations could play within the Canadian politicial system. Rudnicki asserts that a strong tribal identity would strengthen the position of Canadian aboriginal peoples in the international arena.
A Socio-Economic Development Proposal for the Cold Lake Region of Alberta
A first draft of a proposal for a Economic development study, proposed by the Tribal Chiefs Association of North Eastern Alberta, to identify and assess the important factors which are relevant to the development needs and future economic well-being of the Indian Bands represented by the Tribal Chiefs Association of North Eastern Alberta. The study deals primarily with the issue of more immediate funding requirements to upgrade the communities represented by the Association and to equip their people for full involvement in the region's development.
Arctic Speech
A speech, delivered by Walter Rudnicki early in his career to students interested in northern social work. In this speech Rudnicki cautions students to leave behind colonial attitudes and work with Inuit communities in meaningful ways by providing economic, health and welfare supports.
Blacklist Genesis
A timeline developed by Walter Rudnicki documenting events surrounding the 1971 “Blacklist”.
Canada's Dirty Little Secret II: Canada's Post-Confederation Genocide Machine
A second part of Walter Rudnicki's "Canada's Dirty Little Secret: A Race-Based Policy to Extinguish Aboriginal Nations With Finality" (item UM_mss331_A10-039_010_0001_00​1_0001). This installment, also published under the name Eagle Shield, discusses historical and contemporary initiatives of the Canadian government to assimilate indigenous peoples entirely into the larger Canadian population, thus destroying discrete indigenous cultures. The events described in the article took place over a period spanning from 1913 to the late 1980s. A handwritten note at the end of this facsimile transmission says "final chapter pending"; this chapter does not appear to be included in this collection. While the paper itself is undated, the transmission is timestamped 6 March 2000.
Canada's Dirty Little Secret: A Race-Based Policy to Extinguish Aboriginal Nations With Finality
A facsimile copy of a paper written by Walter Rudnicki under the pseudonym "Eagle Shield". This paper, based on a review of colonial records as well as federal policy documents from Confederation to the present day, asserts that the Canadian government is acting to erase the existence of indigenous peoples through assimilating them into a broader Canadian culture. While the paper itself is undated, the facsimile is timestamped 24 January 2000.
Chiefs' Commitee on Enforcement: Draft Strategy Document
A document detailing objectives and strategies of the chiefs' committee on enforcement, as compiled at Regina, Saskatchewan, on 17 and 18 October 1996. Objectives listed include "Stop INAC amendment process", "Propose opt-out or community-specific amendments", and "Establish First Nations alternative process--negotiate and implement".
Collage: Paul Martin sweeping under the rug
A cartoon depicting Finance Minister Paul Martin sweeping indigenous peoples under a rug labelled "Provinces".
Diary Entry December 27, 1976
A diary entry written by Walter Rudnicki on December 27 1976. Rudnicki maintained a diary in the years following his dismissal from Central Mortgage & Housing Corporation.
Draft II: The Aboriginal Constitutional Package of 1992: Its Hidden Sting
A second draft, dated 7 October 1992, of Walter Rudnicki's paper "The Aboriginal Constitutional Package of 1992: Its Hidden Sting". This paper examines attempted changes to the Canadian Constitution (specifically the Meech Lake Accord and the Charlottetown Accord), the effects these changes would have on Canada's indigenous population, and the stances of the various provinces and territories on the status of indigenous peoples. Rudnicki closes with recommendations regarding the Charlottetown Accord: that the aboriginal package should be rejected in its present form; that it may be desirable to seek a court injunction that halts further consideration of the amendments until proper procedure for ratification and consent is determined; and that the rejection of the constitutional amendments should be on the basis that the best that is possible is not good enough, that the acceptance of these amendments would result in the assimilation and extinction of indigenous peoples as a distinct population. Appendices are attached including tables contrasting the constitutional and operational tracks of the government's plans and a series of editorial cartoons relating to the constitutional package. Another folder containing a duplicate of this paper has the following written on the inside of the folder in Rudnicki's handwriting: "Hidden Sting: This paper got wide circulation in Indian communities. Also distributed at all-chiefs meeting in Squamish, BC, which was called by AFN to ratify Charlottetown proposals. Effect was rejection by Indians at Squamish and in community votes. In 1994 - paper also given to Bertha Wilson by Royal Commission member (Rosalie Tizya). Wilson response was that paper 'interesting'."
Draft of letter from Clifford Ahenakew to Pierre Cadieux
A handwritten draft of a letter, written by Walter Rudnicki on behalf of Chief Clifford Ahenakew to Pierre H. Cadieux, the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. The letter is regarding the closing of the Shellbrook district office of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, arguing that the government has not fulfilled its obligations to the people served by the Shellbrook office.
Draft: AFN and Federal Policy
A partial draft of a paper on the Assembly of First Nations and its relationship with the Canadian government. Rudnicki writes of the history of the government's attitude toward indigenous peoples and the AFN, as well as its historical policies regarding indigenous peoples.
Draft: C-52 Discussion Paper
A draft of a discussion paper, written by Walter Rudnicki to address Bill C-52, "An Act Relating to Self-Government For Indian Nations", in 1982. This paper "will outline proposals for legislation to enable local Indian governments at the Band level to become responsible for the social, economic, political, and cultural development of their own Indian communities. The legislation would not be mandatory for all Indian bands; rather, each Band would have the option of deciding if and when it would choose to come under the provisions of this legislation in preference to continuing to be governed by the provisions of the present Indian Act." Rudnicki provides background for his arguments, discussing the history of the relationship between Canadian indigenous peoples and the Canadian government; he also provides a extensive list of the details for his proposed local indigenous govenment legislation.
Draft: Indian Statehood: The Protection and Advancement of Indian Rights by Indians--for Indians
A handwritten draft of an essay written by Walter Rudnicki on behalf of a Joint Council on 22 August 1981. This paper outlines the strategy and position being developed by indigenous organizations, and discusses the need for negotiating and implementing change with the Canadian government. The Joint Council's preferred option is indigenous statehood, and this paper outlines their plans for that eventuality. The typed version of the essay may be found at http://syn.lib.umanitoba.ca/fedora/repository/uofm:5542.
Draft: Legislating a First Nation Vanishing Act
A near-final draft of Walter Rudnicki's paper "Legislating a First Nation Vanishing Act: Parallels with a Failed U.S. Termination Policy". This draft, dated June 2003, discusses the actions and motivations of the Canadian government regarding the indigenous peoples of Canada. Rudnicki asserts that "the dispersal, absorption, and assimilation of First Nations has always been the federal goal". Rudnicki looks at the history of indigenous-government relations from the 1870s to the 21st century, and compares them to similar relations between the indigenous peoples of the United States of America and the American government; the American government explicitly endorsed the termination and assimilation of indigenous peoples.
Draft: The Aboriginal Constitutional Package of 1992: Its Hidden Sting
A draft, dated 4 September 1992, of Walter Rudnicki's paper "The Aboriginal Constitutional Package of 1992: Its Hidden Sting". This paper examines attempted changes to the Canadian Constitution (specifically the Meech Lake Accord and the Charlottetown Accord), the effects these changes would have on Canada's indigenous population, and the stances of the various provinces and territories on the status of indigenous peoples. Rudnicki closes with recommendations regarding the Charlottetown Accord: that the aboriginal package should be rejected in its present form; that it may be desirable to seek a court injunction that halts further consideration of the amendments until proper procedure for ratification and consent is determined; and that the rejection of the constitutional amendments should be on the basis that the best that is possible is not good enough, that the acceptance of these amendments would result in the assimilation and extinction of indigenous peoples as a distinct population.
Draft: White Paper
An unfinished draft of an essay written by Walter Rudnicki on Jean Chrétien's 1969 White Paper. Chrétien was then Minister of Indian Affairs and his paper recommended the rejection of indigenous land claims and the assimilation of indigenous peoples into the Canadian population. Rudnicki's draft discusses the history and background of the White Paper.
Drawing: "They've Even Done Away With Indian Summer"
A cartoon depicting indigenous people looking at a newspaper, the headline of which refers to new federal laws regarding aboriginal self-governance and land claims.
Drawing: Men shaking hands
A line drawing depicting two men -- possibly a European and a First Nations person -- shaking hands.
Drawing: Roundtable Rounddance
A drawing, made by Walter Rudnicki, depicting bureaucrats dancing around an indigenous person tied to a stake.
Drawing: The Colonial Conjuror Making Indians Vanish
A line drawing, by Walter Rudnicki, depicting the Canadian government/European colonisers as a musician making an indigenous person vanish.
Drawing: Two Exits -- One Open
A drawing, made by Walter Rudnicki, representing the dismantling of Canada's Indian Act.
Federal Rules of Engagement, Part 2
A draft copy of “Federal Rules of Engagement: the Government’s war against survivors and churches”, written by Walter Rudnicki and Garnier Residential School survivor Alvin Tolley in June 2000.
First Canadians
A carbon copy of a report, written by Walter Rudnicki, pitching Policy Development Group and its native information services to businesspeople. The five-page report lists the services Policy Development Group can provide to executives.
Government Assistance to Business: When, Why, and How to Seek Government Funding
A report written by Walter Rudnicki for Policy Development Group Limited on 18 April 1979. This report is an introduction to the process of seeking government funding and assistance for businesspeople, and includes tips for securing assistance.
Human Rights Activities in Schools: Summary
A four-page typed summary, written by Walter Rudnicki in August 1976, of human rights activities in Canadian schools. The paper lists the range and types of activities which have been reported, including the organisation and delivery of such activities, the activities' target groups, their geographic scope, and the types of projects themselves.
Indian Capital and Equity: Basis for Economic Development
A report, written by Walter Rudnicki and the Indian Association of Alberta, on 26 April 1980. The paper addresses the issue of indigenous equity in Canada's economic surplus and in Canada's natural resources.
Indian Development Issues Post-Patriation
Typed notes for a speech given by Walter Rudnicki at McMaster University on 2 June 1982. The speech deals with the place of indigenous peoples within the government of Canada, as well as with the struggle for indigenous rights. Rudnicki discusses three options for the political fate of indigenous peoples; this speech is related to his paper "The Third Option: A Native Role in Confederation".
Indian Self-Government: Framework for Discussion and Development
An essay written by Walter Rudnicki on 10 January 1983. In this essay, Rudnicki discusses a proposed framework for aboriginal self-government. The essay deals with the history of aboriginal-government relations in Canada, the problems specific to self-government in Canada, and phases through which self-government could be attained. Rudnicki also includes graphics and flow charts illustrating the power flow within and emanating from the Canadian government.
Indian Self-Government: Options, Trends, and Implications
A report, published by Walter Rudnicki and the Policy Development Group in October 1986, on the Canadian government's position on and reaction to the issue of aboriginal self-government. The introduction to the paper states that its purpose is to address questions relating to the Department of Indian Affairs and its flexibility regarding approaches to indigenous self-government. Rudnicki also attempts an analysis of Ottawa's policy environment; he also approaches the issue in both its modern and historical contexts, identifies a set of trends and implications of Ottawa's current approach to aboriginal self-government, and develops a number of criteria which "may be useful in sorting out and evaluating various models" of aboriginal self-government. A note on the cover page, written by Rudnicki, reads "This paper influenced results of FMC in 1986".
Indian Statehood: The Protection and Advancement of Indian Rights by Indians--for Indians
An essay written by Walter Rudnicki on behalf of a Joint Council on 22 August 1981. This paper outlines the strategy and position being developed by indigenous organizations, and discusses the need for negotiating and implementing change with the Canadian government. The Joint Council's preferred option is indigenous statehood, and this paper outlines their plans for that eventuality.
Inplications of Ongoing Federal Actions
A handwritten fax sent to Fred Sasakamoose, regarding the implications of actions of the Government of Canada towards indigenous peoples' rights. On the cover sheet Rudnicki states that he is also enclosing an article; that article appears to have been lost.
Inuit, Indian, and Métis Community Relocations: Policies, Practices and Impacts
A proposal, written by Walter Rudnicki to John Crump on June 1, 1993.This project outline is the successful bid written by Rudnicki to research the relocation history of Indigenous populations across Canada for the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples. This Policy Development Group-RCAP contract did not continue past the research stage.

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