Alice Cameron Brown fonds
Alice Cameron Brown was born in Rolling River, Manitoba in 1898 and grew up near Minnedosa, Manitoba. She was the daughter of Sarah and Duncan Cameron. In 1921, Alice graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Manitoba. While working as a teacher in Tisdale, Saskatchewan in 1922, she met James Edward Brown. The couple and their daughter Elizabeth Allison lived in Tisdale for twenty-six years. In 1934, Brown won first prize in the Canadian Author's Association poetry contest. The winning poem was published in a few magazines, after which numerous poems of hers were published. In 1952, the Brown family moved to Beamsville, Ontario where James passed away in 1965. Alice Cameron Brown died in 1993. The digitized material from the Alice Cameron Brown fonds consists of correspondence pertaining to Brown's teaching career.
Brown and Gold Yearbooks
The Brown and Gold was the title of the annual yearbook published by the University of Manitoba Students' Union. It was initially published in 1914 and was published annually until 1967. Two volumes were published in the 1970s however after 1967, yearbook publication primarily became the domain of faculties and departments. The Brown and Gold is one of the few sources to document student life on campus, including clubs, societies, athletics, and more. It also lists and provides short biographies of the graduating students for a given year.
Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Winnipeg Chapter fonds
The Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University is a national, non-profit organization that develops and promotes awareness of, leadership in, and financial support for the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The Winnipeg Chapter was founded in 1948.
Canadian Officers Training Corps fonds
With the outbreak of World War I, the University Council appointed a Committee on Military Instruction which authorized the teaching of military science and tactics. A university corps was organized in the fall semester of the 1914-1915 year with 64 students taking extra classes to qualify as officers. On March 1, 1915, the Canadian Officers Training Corps (C.O.T.C.) of the University of Manitoba was established. Eight companies of 60 men of all ranks were formed with Professor E.P. Fetherstonhaugh as captain and adjutant. In 1915, the Western Universities Battalion was formed with the University of Manitoba contributing one company and one platoon. With the introduction of conscription legislation in 1917, military training was made compulsory for all male students. After the First World War, the C.O.T.C. program was reorganized, in 1920, by Lt. Col. N.B. Maclean, but it continued in relative obscurity for almost twenty years. With the outbreak of World War II, the C.O.T.C. was quickly revitalized and its membership mushroomed, from its peace time level of 150 to 800. The Senate also passed regulations relating to academic credits or bonuses for students who joined the C.O.T.C. By 1942, all male students were once again required to enlist in a compulsory programme of military training. The C.O.T.C. continued the work of military training on a voluntary basis after World War II with new modernized and attractive programmes, but with the return of peace its popularity rapidly declined.
Centre for Settlement Studies fonds
At a meeting in 1966, a group representing several departments of the University of Manitoba expressed a common interest in an interdisciplinary approach to the problems associated with human settlement. Their concern focused primarily on the communities of western and northern Canada. A request for funding, presented to the Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation, was favourably received resulting in the formation of the Centre for Settlement Studies in 1967 with John E. Page as first Director. Believing that the social and economic problems associated with human settlement might be a limiting factor in the settlement of Canada's northern communities, Page made this topic the first major focus of research. By 1974, the Centre had reached its peak of activity. The Centre for Settlement Studies ceased to function on June 30, 1976, although research projects continued to be published well into 1977. The digital collection includes the Centre's Source Files including drafts of publications, papers and presentations, partially completed projects, analyses, and related data.
Doris Saunders fonds
Doris Saunders was born in Winnipeg in 1901. In 1917 she graduated from Kelvin High School and then enrolled at the University of Manitoba, where in 1921 she graduated with Gold Medals in both Philosophy and English. Upon graduation, she taught at a rural elementary school before heading to Oxford. After graduating from Oxford with a Diploma of Education in 1923 she taught at both Machray Junior High and Kelvin High School. In 1925, while still teaching, she completed a MA at the University of Manitoba. In 1928, Saunders became the first female appointed to the Department of English at the University of Manitoba and in 1959 became the first female full Professor in the Faculty of Arts. From 1933 to 1945 she was the Dean of Junior Women and was the Registrar of University College from 1964 to 1968, when she retired. Doris Saunders passed away in 2001. The digitized material from the Doris Saunders fonds consists of copies of an address Saunders gave titled "Continuing Education for Women in Canada."
Emil and Lynette Hain fonds
The Emil and Lynette Hain fonds consists of a collection of glass slides created by Ms. Hain's grandfather, Rev. Thomas Featherstone Watson, who documented the missionary work being undertaken in the Transvaal region of South Africa prior to the onset of the Boer War in 1899. Rev. Watson created glass slides from his original negatives and used them as the basis of his lecture tour titled "Missionary Labours in the Transvaal Before the War: Glimpses of Missionary Life in the Transvaal." The scenes depicted in this digital collection include the South African people, culture and countryside, churches, church services, European and South African ministers, and other glimpses into missionary life in South Africa. The rare and fascinating images in this collection provide some insight into the controversial practice of missionary work in a little-seen region of the world just prior to the outbreak of a violent war only a few years later.
Faculty of Agriculture fonds
Manitoba Agricultural College was formerly opened in 1906. In the following year, Manitoba Agricultural College became affiliated with the University of Manitoba so that the degree in agriculture could be conferred on students who had successfully completed the five-year course. However, the affiliation of Manitoba Agricultural College with the University was terminated by an Act of the Provincial Legislature in 1912 when the College was granted degree conferring powers. However, in 1916, the Act was amended and the affiliation between the College and University was restored again. The University of Manitoba conferred the degree Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A) for the first time in May 1911. Regular instruction in Home Economics began the same year and the degree of Bachelor of Home Economics (B.H.E.) was first conferred in May 1918. On March 1, 1924, by Act of the Manitoba Legislature, the administration of Manitoba Agricultural College was transferred to the Board of Governors of the University and it was arranged that in future, the instructional work of the College could be carried on as a Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics of the University. The length of the degree courses in both Agriculture and Home Economics was reduced to four sessions in 1927-1928 to conform with the other university faculties. In 1929, the Legislature selected the site in Fort Garry, already occupied by the Manitoba Agricultural College since 1913, as the permanent site of the university. A systematic program of work in the field of rural adult education was begun in 1940. By 1941, the Faculty consisted of six departments: Animal Science, Bacteriology and Animal Pathology, Dairy Husbandry, Entomology, Plant Science ,and Soils. In 1946, the Department of Agricultural Engineering was added to the faculty. In 1966, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics opened the Centre for Applied Research at Glenlea, twenty kilometers south of Winnipeg. In 1970, the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics separated into two independent faculties, Agriculture and Home Economics. Beginning in 1971, the Faculty of Agriculture, through sponsorship from the provincial government, became involved with various foreign aid programs. This culminated in 1979 when the Canadian International Development Agency (C.I.D.A.) financed a joint agricultural program with the University of Zambia. In July 1991, the Faculty became the Faculty of Agricultural and Food Sciences.
Faculty of Human Ecology fonds
The present Faculty of Human Ecology traces its beginnings to a diploma in Household Sciences in 1910 at the Manitoba Agricultural College. The Diploma program became a degree in Home Economics in 1915. Three years later, Mary Kelso was named first Director of Home Economics. In 1924, the Manitoba Agricultural College became the Faculty of Agriculture and Home Economics at the University of Manitoba. In 1943, the Division of Home Economics became the School of Home Economics, but remained within the Faculty of Agriculture. In 1950, the School of Home Economics moved back into its original building following renovations, ending 26 years of residence in temporary buildings. The Departments of Food and Nutrition and Clothing and Textiles were created in 1967. The School of Home Economics was not granted official faculty status until 1970, ending a 60-year tie with the Faculty of Agriculture. In the following year, a Department of Family Studies was created with Dr. Lola Jackson as Head. The Faculty changed its name in 1981 to Human Ecology, reflecting the diversification of curricula. The next year saw the creation of a Bachelor degree in Human Ecology and, in 1983, a Ph.D. in Food and Nutritional Sciences was offered in conjunction with the Faculty of Agriculture.
Faculty of Nursing fonds
The first nursing course at the University of Manitoba was offered in 1944, the result of a Government of Canada grant to the Canadian Nurses Association for nursing education. Six years later the School of Nursing was established. In 1959 the first degree program in nursing was discussed and three years later the first students were accepted. In 1963 a four year program leading to a Bachelor of Nursing was initiated. The program was revamped in 1975 to study public health and to concentrate on illness prevention. By 1980 a Masters program had been developed, and in 1984 the Manitoba Nursing Research Institute was established at the University of Manitoba. The School of Nursing received faculty status in 1992. The digitized material from the Faculty of Nursing fonds consists of textual records pertaining to seminars on women in the field of nursing.
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreational Studies fonds
The first program of physical education was offered in 1951 in the Department of Physical Recreation and Athletics. A Bachelor degree in Physical Education was first offered in 1964, reflecting a change in philosophy with physical education as a bona fide educational field. Facilities for the Department of Physical Recreation were lacking until the swimming pool was built in 1965 and, more importantly, when the Frank Kennedy Physical Education Centre was completed in 1972. Facilities were improved when construction commenced on the Max Bell Winter Sports Complex in 1981. A Bachelor of Recreation Studies degree was approved by Senate in April 1981 and Faculty status was achieved in May 1982. In 1990, the Master of Physical Education was changed to the Master of Science. In the spring of 1998, a four-year degree program, the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science, a revised three-year B.P.E. degree, and a Master of Arts in Recreation Studies were approved by the Council on Post-Secondary Education. In September 2004, the degree designation of the Bachelor of Recreation Studies was changed to the Bachelor of Recreation Management and Community Development. In December 2005, Senate approved the name change of the Bachelor of Exercise and Sport Science degree program to the Bachelor of Kinesiology degree program, which became effective in the fall of 2006. At the same time, the Master's of Science in Exercise and Sport Science was renamed the Master's of Science in Kinesiology. Effective July 2007, the University of Manitoba Board of Governors approved the recommendation to change the Faculty name to the Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management.
Helen Glass fonds
Dr. Helen Glass was born in Regina, Saskatchewan in 1917. She received a Bachelor of Nursing degree from Teachers' College, Columbia University in 1960, followed by an M.A., a M.Ed, and finally a Ph.D. of Education in 1971, also from Columbia. She began teaching nursing courses at the University of Manitoba in 1953. Devoted to enhancing the profession of nursing and the quality of medical care, Glass was founder of the Manitoba Nursing Research Institute, President of the Manitoba Association of Registered Nurses, President of the Canadian Nurses Association and first Vice-President of the International Council of Nurses. She served on the Canadian Delegation to the World Health Assembly in 1983 and again in 1985. Dr. Helen Glass retired officially from the School of Nursing in 1986. She is currently Professor Emerita at the University of Manitoba. The digitized material from the Helen Glass fonds consists of textual records pertaining to Glass' education at Columbia Teachers' College, her teaching and administrative work at the University of Manitoba, and her work with professional nursing associations.
Hilda Morrish fonds
Hilda Morrish grew up in Hove, England and joined the Women's Royal Naval Service in 1940. Morrish's parents were pacifists and disapproved of her joining the WRNS. Their disapproval led to her request for a transfer to civilian work assisting tha arriving United States Army in Gloucester, Cheltenham. Morrish was later in Paris on VE Day and toured France and Germany immediately following the war. The digitized material on this site includes images of black and white photographs taken by Hilda Morrish with a Voigtlander 35 mm camera. The photographs were developed and printed in a makeshift photo lab in a hotel bathroom. A bidet was used to wash the prints and an enlarger to magnify the images.
Irene Knysh fonds
Irene Knysh was a feminist, journalist, and author of many books on the Ukrainian women’s movement. Throughout the course of her illustrious writing career, Knysh corresponded with leaders of the Ukrainian women's movement in Canada and the United States, most notably Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, one of the founding members of the Ukrainian National Women's League of America. Knysh also corresponded with famed Ukrainian dance instructor, Vasil' Avramenko. This digital collection features items from the Irene Knysh fonds, many of which were acquired by Knysh during the course of her research. Items featured in the collection include the original record book of the Ukrainian Women's Association of Canada (1930-1931) and photographs of Irene Knysh, Stefaniia Abrahamovs'ka, members of the National Women's League of America (SUA - Soiuz Ukrainok Ameryky), and Vasil' Avramenko.
Jennifer Shay fonds
Dr. Jennifer Shay (nee Walker) was born in 1930, in Hull, England. Upon graduation from Newland High School in 1948, Dr. Shay attended London University where she obtained a B.Sc. in 1952. She briefly worked at the Flatford Mill Field Centre in Suffolk but moved to Canada in 1957 where she worked as a research associate at the University of Manitoba. At the U of M, Dr. Shay completed a M.Sc. in 1959 and a Doctor of Philosophy in Science in 1964, while lecturing for the Department of Botany. She became a full professor in 1975. In 1966, she was appointed founding director of the Delta Marsh Field Station, a position she held until 1986. In addition, she fulfilled a joint appointment in the Departments of Landscape Architecture and Botany from 1975 to 1986 and again from 1989 to 1993. Although Dr. Shay retired in 1993, she remained a Senior Scholar and was awarded the title Professor Emerita in 1995. The digitized material from the Jennifer Shay fonds consists of annual reports of Shay's teaching activities.
Jill Oakes fonds
Jill Oakes received a Bachelor of Human Ecology (1975), an Education Certificate (1976), a Master's of Science (1985) and a Ph.D (1988) from the University of Manitoba. Oakes began lecturing at the University of Manitoba in 1987 and has also lectured as an adjunct professor in the Departments of Anthropology and Human Ecology at the University of Alberta. She has served as research associate for the Canadian Circumpolar Institute at the University of Alberta and from 1993-1994, was Chair of Northern Studies, Department of Native Studies at Trent University. Oakes' work with museum collections has taken her on collecting trips to Greenland, Northwest Territories, Alaska, and the far east of Russia. Oakes has researched, coordinated and curated many exhibitions. Featured here are records documenting Oakes' research and involvement with the Minnguq Sewing Group.
John Leslie Charles fonds
Major John Leslie Charles was a Chief Engineer for Candian National Railway's (CN) Western Region and consulting engineer for CN. He later became responsible for much of the engineering and construction in western Canada, northern Manitoba, and the Northwest Territories. In 1926, he was appointed as a transit man for a survey crew and surveyed the second section of the Hudson Bay Railway (Limestone- Fort Churchill). He also published studies of the Great Slave Lake Railway, the first railway to enter the Northwest Territories and the most northerly railway connected to the continental system. The collection includes articles, reports and maps created by Charles regarding Northern Canadian railway routes.
Kathleen Rice fonds
Kathleen Rice, a former math teacher, and her brother, Lincoln, decided to stake a homestead near The Pas, Manitoba. Lincoln joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force but Kathleen decided to stay on the homestead alone. After teaching herself about geology and prospecting, she headed to the Herb Lake area north of The Pas. She claimed an island - later called Rice Island - in Weksusko Lake, which turned out to be very rich in copper and nickel. The fonds includes newsclippings about Rice and manuscripts and drawings by Rice about her time in Northern Manitoba.
Marie Barton fonds
Marie Barton (nee Rossander) was born in Huntofte, Denmark in 1905. In 1911, she immigrated with her family to Kerrobert, Saskatchewan. She married Leonard Barton in 1928. Overcoming the barriers that existed for married women, Barton taught for four more years to help buy a farm in Davidson, Saskatchewan. The prairie drought of the 1930s drove her and her family from their Davidson farm to a farm at Togo, Saskatchewan and then to Camperville, Manitoba. In 1943, following the death of her husband, Marie returned to teaching to support her four children. In 1955 she graduated from the University of Manitoba with her Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Education degrees. Marie taught for several decades in Manitoba, first in country schools in the Dauphin area and then in Winnipeg where she managed the pilot program for Junior High School visually impaired students until her retirement in 1970. Marie Barton passed away in 1999. The digitized material from the Marie Barton fonds consists of textual and photographic records pertaining to Ms. Barton's teaching career, including her work with visually-impaired children.
Mary Kinnear fonds
Dr. E. Mary Kinnear is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Manitoba and is a former head of the department. She has written extensively on women's history with a particular emphasis on women in Manitoba. The digitized material from the Mary Kinnear fonds consists of a series of interviews Dr. Kinnear conducted with female professionals in Manitoba. Several of the interviewees are educators but all discuss their educational backgrounds.
McLuhan the Manitoban
Herbert Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980) is widely recognized as the pioneer of contemporary media studies, including media literacy. He was brought up in the Fort Rouge area of Winnipeg and received his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Manitoba. McLuhan eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge University, and became a professor of English literature, prophetic poet, satirist, and renowned communications visionary & media commentator. Virtually everything for which Marshall McLuhan became internationally renowned was already evident in his public writings as a young man living in Winnipeg and studying at the University of Manitoba. Several articles written for The Manitoban between 1930 and 1934 have been digitized here by The University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections with the permission of the Estate of Marshall McLuhan.
Melita and David A. Ennis fonds
The Melita and David A. Ennis fonds consists of 2 scrapbooks featuring photographs depicting life in Churchill, Manitoba between 1929 and 1932. The photographs depict construction projects, settlement communities, rail roads, indigenous peoples, Charles and Anne Lindbergh, and images of northern landscapes. They document the process of mechanization and frontier expansion.
Monique Hébert fonds
En 1981, Monique Hébert compléta un Baccalauréat es arts à l’Université du Québec à Montréal. Elle compléta en 1987 une maîtrise es arts à l’Université du Manitoba. En 1994 elle recevait son doctorat en histoire de l’Université du Manitoba ayant complété sa thèse sur la contribution des Franco-manitobaines à la survie de la communauté de 1916 à 1947. Dès 1982, elle commençait une carrière dans l’enseignement au Manitoba, d’abord aux niveaux secondaire et pré-secondaire au Collège Saint-Jean-Baptiste et au Selkirk Junior High (1982 à 1990) puis de 1994 à 1995 au secondaire et pré-secondaire de l'École communautaire Aurèle-Lemoine. Pendant ce temps elle a été active au sein de nombreux organisme et a, entre autres, été présidente du Réseau national action éducation femmes, présidente des Éducatrices et éducateurs francophones du Manitoba (1990 à 1992), et membre de Pluri-Elles, Réseau, du Manitoba Teacher’s Society, de l’Institut de recherches et études féministes et du Women’s Historians and History of Women in Manitoba. Elle enseigna aussi à l’Université d’Ottawa et à l’Université du Québec à Hull. Elle est décédée en 1999. Au cours de sa carrière elle a administré deux projets d’histoire orale, soit un avec la Ville de Beloeil (Québec) et l’autre avec la Société historique de Saint-Boniface sur le rôle des Franco-manitobaines dans la survie de la communauté. Son fonds comprend des documents produits au cours de ses recherches portant sur les Franco-protestants du Québec et sur les femmes franco-manitobaines (1976-1998). Ses recherches sur les femmes franco-manitobaines ont servi à rédiger sa thèse pour remplir les exigences en vue de l’obtention d’un doctorat de l’Université du Manitoba. Les documents ainsi produits comprennent des notes de recherche, des photocopies de documents des archives de l’Association d’éducation des Canadiens-Français du Manitoba (dont des copies des rapports de visiteur et de la correspondance); de la correspondance au sujet de la thèse (avec sa directrice); des compilations de données; d’autres documents de recherche (en large partie des photocopies d’articles) et des cassettes sonores d’entrevues avec des femmes franco-manitobaines (y compris des sommaires et les ententes de dépôt et d’accès). (57 cm et 3 cartes) On y trouve donc 43 cassettes sonores fruit d’un projet d’histoire orale sous l’égide de la Société historique de Saint-Boniface. Des sommaires détaillés des entrevues les accompagnent.
Nan Shipley fonds
Nan Shipley published fourteen books and numerous short stories and articles. Her first book, Anna and the Indians (1955), has been reprinted many times. Among her better known publications are Frances and the Crees (1957), The Railway Builders (1965), The James Evan Story (1966), and Churchill: Canada’s Northern Gateway (1974). As a big supporter of Aboriginal and Metis culture, she organized Manitoba’s first Indian handicrafts sales centre (1959) and focused her writing on Indian and Metis women. Her photograph collection depicts hydro and railroad developments in northern Manitoba and of the growth and demise of northern towns and settlements. Among the portraits are native peoples and early missionaries and settlers.
Neepawa Film Collection
Collection consists of films created to document events or activities in the town of Neepawa. The digitized material from the Neepawa Film Collection consists of home-movie footage shot by Roy McGillivray documenting the progress of the 1966 fire of St. Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church, which was built on Mountain Road during 1923-1925, as well as the appearance of the site the following winter, and the building used as a temporary facility by the congregation.
Sandra Barz fonds
Sandra Barz completed her education at Skidmore College graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in 1952. She began her career in publishing and later became interested in Inuit art after purchasing a few pieces while visiting Canada. Thereafter she began to research and compile information relating to Inuit prints from Arctic Quebec/Puvirnituq, Baker Lake, Cape Dorset, Clyde River, Holman Island, and Pangnirtung. Her first exploration in this field involved developing, editing, and publishing 28 issues of Arts and Culture of the North from 1976 to 1984. She followed this work with a series of three volumes titled Inuit Artists Print Workbook, Volumes I, II, and III. The volumes catalogue over 8,000 Inuit print images dating from 1957 to the present, produced in the aforementioned communities, as well as prints produced independently of the Arctic co-operative system. Barz's papers detail over forty years of dedication to documenting Inuit artist biographies, the evolution of printmaking, and encouraging growing interest for Inuit art worldwide.
Sister Servants of Mary Immaculate fonds
The Sister Servants of Mary Immaculate are an international congregation of Sisters of the Ukrainian Catholic Church (in union with Rome). Founded over a hundred years ago in Western Ukraine, they strive to follow the example of their patroness Mary, the Immaculate Mother of God. They are committed to a communal life of prayer and service of God's people, primarily but not exclusively, those of the Ukrainian Catholic Church. In Canada they have been extensively involved in the educational apostolate from nursery school to the University levels. They have conducted residential and day high schools for young women, including Immaculate Heart Academy and Immaculate Heart School in Winnipeg. At present Sisters teach at Immaculate Heart of Mary School in Winnipeg. Sisters have also organized and directed the Religious Education Centre in the Archeparchy of Winnipeg. The digitized material from the Sister Servants of Mary Immaculate (SSMI) fonds consists of 200 digitized photographs of the Sisters engaged in educational endeavours in Manitoba. The photographs were originally part of the Chronicles created by the SSMI. The Chronicles detail the activities conducted by the SSMI for the Ukrainian Catholic Religious Education Centre from 1977 to 2003.
University Relations and Information Office fonds
The University Relations and Information Office was created in 1958 to publicize events at the University of Manitoba through various forms of media. Operating directly under the authority of the President, the Office prepared articles, press releases and public displays. The Office financed Alumni Association activities and publications such as the Alumni Journal. Eventually the Alumni Association assumed the public relations arm for University alumni while internal University news was covered by the Information Office through publication of the bi-monthly newspaper, The Bulletin. In 1960, secretarial staff was added to the Office, and the Public Relations Officer and Information Assistant became the Executive Director of the Alumni Association and Associate Editor of the Alumni Journal, respectively.
University of Manitoba Glee Club
The first meeting of the University of Manitoba Glee Club was held on Thursday 9 October 1924 and F.W. Armstrong was elected as the Club's first President. The Glee Club garnered many accolades for its musical performances and set designs. This exhibit includes performance programs, photographs, and a Glee Club scrapbook with photographs, newspaper clippings and playbills. The material is selected from the University of Manitoba Glee Club fonds (UA SC 15), the University of Manitoba Glee Club collection (MSS 347), and the University Relations and Information Office fonds (PC 80). It reflects the activities of the University of Manitoba Glee Club, the University Dramatic Society (a precursor), and theatre productions at the university.
University of Manitoba Students' Union fonds
In 1906, a students' union was organized as part of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. In 1907, the Student Representative Council was organized by the University Council, but it was not until 1919 that the University of Manitoba Students' Union (U.M.S.U.) was officially sanctioned. The U.M.S.U. Constitution was written in 1940 and featured the following objectives: to supply students with extra-curricular activities, to facilitate personal contracts, to keep students informed on U.M.S.U. decisions, to bring the University into closer contact with the public, to attain continuity of student government, to act as an effective lobby to the Provincial government, to make academic proposals, and to work for the erection of a students' building. U.M.S.U. is under the control of a Council made up of student representatives from various faculties, schools, colleges, and residences on campus. The President and Vice-President hold the highest administrative posts in U.M.S.U. and are flanked by the Directors of Student Services, Administration, Communication, and Programming.
Walter Eggertson fonds
Walter Eggertson was a Winnipeg-born, Wesley College student at the outbreak of the First World War. In 1916, Eggertson left the college and enlisted in the army. Over the course of his service in England and France with the 223rd and 27th Battalions, Eggertson kept two diaries, documenting his war experiences between 1917 and 1918. The digital material from the Walter Eggertson fonds consists of the transcription for both diaries held by Archives & Special Collections.
Walter Rudnicki fonds
Walter Rudnicki (Eagle Shield) (1925 - 2010) was a passionate advocate for Aboriginal rights in Canada. For most of his life he worked relentlessly as a public servant and private consultant to improve lives of Canadian Aboriginal Peoples. Rudnicki, as a public servant and a private consultant, worked with both the Government and Aboriginal Peoples revealing problems with their relationship. This collection consists of the reports written by Walter Rudnicki as a private consultant.
Women and Education
Women have provided invaluable contributions to the development of Canada's education system. Through the presentation of digitized archival material, this collection is intended to detail the successes of women in the field of education, as well as the difficulties faced by many of these women in their chosen field, such as overcoming gender inequality in the workforce. Over 3000 textual, photographic, audio, and visual records from the holdings of the University of Manitoba Archives & Special Collections, the Ukrainian Catholic Archeparchy of Winnipeg Archives, and the Societé Historique de Saint-Boniface pertaining to the topic of women in education have been digitized for this collection.